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I have the following code and I was wondering if anyone could help explain how it works.

I have a very basic class

class Configs
  attr_accessor :config_files

  def initialize(*config_files)
    @config_files = config_files
  end
end


configs = Configs.new('config.txt','config1.txt')

configs.each { |c| puts c }

config.txt
config1.txt
=> ['config.txt', 'config1.txt']

if configs is a Configs instance, how does the each method find the array inside?

share|improve this question
    
Which version of Ruby are you using? Just this snippet in isolation on Ruby 1.9.3 doesn't work. – detunized Oct 16 '13 at 17:30
    
Did you copy/paste incorrectly? When I run your example, I see gist.github.com/davidann/7012132 – Davidann Oct 16 '13 at 18:02
1  
Actually, I made a mistake by using Rubymine's IRB console. After a reload the each method was still working because I implemented my own previously, and just hacking around I removed it and it still worked. I wasnt sure how that was possible which led me to ask the question. After seeing all the replies I completely killed the process and the each method was gone. Thanks for all the thoughtful and timely replies though, love this community. – fsck3r Oct 16 '13 at 20:50
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code doesn't work as displayed:

class Configs
  attr_accessor :config_files

  def initialize(*config_files)
    @config_files = config_files
  end
end

configs = Configs.new('config.txt','config1.txt')

configs.each { |c| puts c }
# ~> -:12:in `<main>': undefined method `each' for #<Configs:0x007f8a41899810> (NoMethodError)

You'd need to change it to:

configs.config_files.each { |c| puts c }
# >> config.txt
# >> config1.txt

configs is your instance of the Configs class. (Actually you should call it Config, as a class is more likely to be a single occurrence of something, and config as a single instance of that class.)

configs has an instance variable @config_files, which is an array. There is a config_files accessor to it that returns that instance variable.

Using configs.config_files returns a reference to @config_files, which does have an each method, because it's an array.

share|improve this answer

Beacuse you use *config_files,which created the array,when the line configs = Configs.new('config.txt','config1.txt') executed. Your Configs.new called actaully Class#new,which also called you #initialize method,where you used splatted argument.One simple demo

*a = 1,2,3
a # => [1, 2, 3]

Corrcted code

class Configs
  attr_accessor :config_files

  def initialize(*config_files)
    @config_files = config_files
  end
end


configs = Configs.new('config.txt','config1.txt')

configs.config_files.each {|c| puts c}

# >> config.txt
# >> config1.txt
share|improve this answer
    
This is not the question. He's asking how come Configs has each method. – detunized Oct 16 '13 at 17:31
    
@detunized probably he did wrong copy - paste.. – Arup Rakshit Oct 16 '13 at 17:33

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