Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a ASP.NET website running in IIS. On one of the pages, I was experiencing a problem in trying to connect to my DB (Login Failed. The login is from an untrusted domain...).

Now I understand what this problem is but I couldn't understand why I would get it on one page and not another. I finally decided to print out the UserDomainName and UserName (using the Environment Class) on each page (using my MasterPage). It turns out that the page that couldn't connect to the DB was indeed using the local computer account and the pages that can connect to the DB are using the Domain account.

My question: Can anyone tell me why/or how these variables can be different from page to page?

Extra info:
Server: Windows Server 2003
IIS: 6.0
ASP.NET 2.0
Code: VB.NET
DB Server and IIS are separate machines.
Both DB and IIS are on the same Domain.

I am not looking to simply add my local server username/credentials to the DB server login. I want to know how/why the ASP pages are running under different username/accounts.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Are these two pages running under different app-pools ?

share|improve this answer
    
Is that configurable per page? I can only see an app-pool designation per folder (site). Am I confused? –  jsb1109 Oct 16 '13 at 18:01
    
App-Pool are designated per site. It's tough to tell the issue without looking the code. –  Jardalu Oct 16 '13 at 20:12
    
So is there a way you can think of that the page got created in my site and was set to run under a different app-pool designation. I can't seem to even guess how this could occur. The page in question is clearly under my sites directory structure. –  jsb1109 Oct 17 '13 at 12:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.