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I'm trying to understand the different ways to create objects and methods in javascript. I've read a lot of articles, blogs and stackoverflow questions and I think I get the notion in general. But I've encountered a small javascript library (written in coffeescript) and the the way it creates objects and methods confused me a little.

I've included a snippet but if you want you can find the complete script at instafeed.js.

Code:

(function() {
    var Instafeed, root;

    Instafeed = (function() {

        function Instafeed(params) {
            var option, value;
            this.options = {
                target: 'instafeed',
                get: 'popular',
                resolution: 'thumbnail',
                sortBy: 'most-recent',
                links: true,
                limit: 15,
                mock: false
            };
            if (typeof params === 'object') {
                for (option in params) {
                  value = params[option];
                  this.options[option] = value;
                }
            }
        }

        Instafeed.prototype.run = function() {
            var header, instanceName, script;
            if (typeof this.options.clientId !== 'string') {
                if (typeof this.options.accessToken !== 'string') {
                  throw new Error("Missing clientId or accessToken.");
                }
            }
            if (typeof this.options.accessToken !== 'string') {
                if (typeof this.options.clientId !== 'string') {
                  throw new Error("Missing clientId or accessToken.");
                }
            }
            if ((this.options.before != null) && typeof this.options.before === 'function') {
                this.options.before.call(this);
            }
            if (typeof document !== "undefined" && document !== null) {
                script = document.createElement('script');
                script.id = 'instafeed-fetcher';
                script.src = this._buildUrl();
                header = document.getElementsByTagName('head');
                header[0].appendChild(script);
                instanceName = "instafeedCache" + this.unique;
                window[instanceName] = new Instafeed(this.options);
                window[instanceName].unique = this.unique;
            }
            return true;
        }

    ...

        return Instafeed;

    })();

    root = typeof exports !== "undefined" && exports !== null ? exports : window;

    root.Instafeed = Instafeed;

}).call(this);

I'm having difficulties understanding the following:

  1. Why did the author prefer to wrap everything with (function(){...}).call(this);? Maybe to avoid creating global variables?

  2. What purpose does the .call(this) part at the very end of the script serve?

  3. Why did the author create the root variable and what are the following lines for?

    root = typeof exports !== "undefined" && exports !== null ? exports : window;
    root.Instafeed = Instafeed;
    

Since this the preferred way to create objects and methods in coffeescript I suppose this is one of the better ways to do it. But its advantages over the following version escapes me:

function Instafeed(params) {
    ...
}
Instafeed.prototype.run = function() {
    ...
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

  1. Yes; this makes all formerly top-level vars into local variables.

  2. It makes this equal to the global object inside the function

  3. It lets it work as a CommonJS module (for Node.js or Browserify)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick response. Do you have any comments on the last part? (Advantages over common way...) –  monroo Oct 18 '13 at 7:41
    
@monroo: Advantages of which differences? –  SLaks Oct 18 '13 at 11:49

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