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i have multiple text files on notepad placed in a directory i.e d:\documents.I want a batch file to add a line at the end of each of them but they are more than 60 or 70 of them.Just need a batch file to add this line automatically.Any ideas please???

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Try something like this:

@echo off

>"%TEMP%\newline.txt" echo.

pushd "C:\documents"
for %%f in (*.txt) do copy /b "%%~f" + "%TEMP%\newline.txt" "%%~f"
popd

del "%TEMP%\temp.txt"
  • >"%TEMP%\temp.txt" echo.: create a (temporary) file with just a newline in it.

  • pushd "C:\documents": change the current working directory to C:\documents.

  • for %%f in (*.txt) do ...: iterate over all text files in the current directory.

  • copy /b "%%~f" + "%TEMP%\newline.txt" "%%~f": copy the content of the current file plus the newline from the temporary file back to the current file.

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This code will add a CRLF to the end of every file if it does not have one,
and will then add the text This is the last line as the last line of each file.

@echo off
for /f "delims=" %%a in ('dir *.txt /a:-d /b') do (
   findstr /v ".*$" "%%a" >nul && (>>"%%a" echo.)
   >>"%%a" echo This is the last line
)
share|improve this answer
    
Using FINDSTR /V ".*$" to detect files with missing newline on last line will only work properly for Windows based files that have <CR><LF> at the end of each line. Unix style files that end with <LF> will mistakenly get the extra line because the $ anchor simply looks for a <CR> character. It is not uncommon to find Unix style files on a Windows machine. – dbenham Oct 17 '13 at 4:41
    
@dbenham Yes Dave that's true, it won't handle Unix formatted files the same way. It does however work well on Windows files and doesn't need delayed expansion. – foxidrive Oct 17 '13 at 4:58

You might have to worry about files that are missing the newline character at the end of the last line. If you simply append a new line, it will be appended to the last line instead of adding a new line.

The following should work with any file, regardless whether the last line ends with a newline character. It conditionally appends a newline character before appending the new line if and only if the original file last line is missing the terminating newline character.

@echo off
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
:: Define LF to contain a newline character
set LF=^


:: The above two blank lines are critical - DO NOT REMOVE

for %%F in (d:\documents\*.txt) do (
  findstr /v "!LF!" "%%F" >nul && (echo()
  (echo Your new line goes here)
)>>"%%F"

The above will not work if any file names contain !. In the unlikely event that you do have file names that contain !, then you will need to toggle delayed expansion on and off within the loop.

@echo off
setlocal
:: Define LF to contain a newline character
set LF=^


:: The above two blank lines are critical - DO NOT REMOVE

for %%F in (d:\documents\*.txt) do (
  set "file=%%F"
  setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
  findstr /v "!LF!" "!file!" >nul && (echo()
  endlocal
  (echo Your new line goes here)
)>>"%%F"

UPDATE

As foxidrive pointed out in his comment, the above solutions will append Windows style lines ending with <CR><LF> to Unix style files with lines ending with <LF>. Such hybrid line types may not be desireable.

The code below will properly append the line with the correct line terminator. The code assumes any file that contains a <CR> is in Windows format. It also assumes any file that does not contain <LF> is in Windows format.

@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion

set "line=YOUR NEW LINE GOES HERE"

:: Define LF to contain a newline character
set LF=^


:: The above two blank lines are critical - DO NOT REMOVE

for %%F in (d:\test\test\*.txt) do (
  set "unix="
  findstr $ "%%F" >nul || cmd /v:on /c "findstr "!LF!" "%%F" >nul" && set unix=1
  cmd /v:on /c findstr /v "!LF!" "%%F" ^>nul && (
    if defined unix (cmd /v:on /c "echo(&echo(!lf!"|findstr /v $) else (echo()
  )
  if defined unix (
    cmd /v:on /c "echo(&echo(!line!!lf!"|findstr /v $
  ) else (
    setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
    echo(!line!
    endlocal
  )
)>>"%%F"
share|improve this answer
    
There's a nifty use of findstr Dave - see my answer. – foxidrive Oct 17 '13 at 4:24
    
@foxidrive - Close, but that technique is not reliable. See my comment to your answer. – dbenham Oct 17 '13 at 4:44
    
Dave, your code doesn't work reliably with Unix files either. It appends CRLF sets and so creates hybrid files. – foxidrive Oct 17 '13 at 5:02
    
@foxidrive - True, a unix style file could become hybrid as you say. But it would have the correct number of lines. The hybrid nature may or may not be a problem. – dbenham Oct 17 '13 at 5:11
    
@foxidrive - I've added a solution that does not create hybrid files. – dbenham Oct 17 '13 at 18:35

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