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I'm trying to add tests to a legacy code, and as I start to adding code, I get the feeling that something is wrong.

In the following code, the public method RegisterChange is calling two private methods to:

  1. Get the object to store
  2. Store the object
public class ChangeService {

    IRepository repository;

    public ChangeService(IRepository repository){
        this.repository = repository;
    }

    public bool RegisterChange( int entityId ){ 
        var entity = GetParsedEntity( entityId );       
        SaveEntity( entity );
        return true;
    }

    private Entity GetParsedEntity( int id ) {
        var entity = repository.GetEntityById( id );
        return new Entity{ Name = entity.Name };
    }

    private void SaveEntity( Entity entity ) {
        repository.Save( Entity );
    }
}

public class ChangeServiceFact(){

    [Fact]
    public void When_valid_entity__Should_save_entity(){

        var mock = new Mock<IRepository>();
        var service = new ChangeService(mock.object);

        var result = service.RegisterChange( 0 );

        Assert.True(result);
    }   
}

So, when Im mocking the repository, I had to go and check the private method's code to know which operations to mock.

The problem that I'm seeing with this approach is that, because the code is testing not only the test subject (the public method) but also the private methods, is not clear which should be the test result by looking at the test subject (public method).

In the case that, later on, someone decide to modify one private method (like throwing an exception from GetParsedEntity), the test will continue to pass correctly, but the client code could fail because of this change.

In this particular case, Im using C#, XUnit and Moq, but I think is more a general testing question.

share|improve this question
    
Surely the test would not pass, because the exception would be thrown when you call RegisterChange. If it would sometimes throw an exception, then it's up to the person making the change to add a test for that. It should still be in line with the documented (ahem) behaviour of the public method. –  Jon Skeet Oct 16 '13 at 19:16
    
@JonSkeet, let's says the change to GetParsedInt is not a breaking one, but a new functionality, in that case the old test is not aware of that. I understand a new test would pick up the new functionality test. So, my question is "Is this the normal methodology?" (just to give it a name). Thanks. –  andymaster01 Oct 16 '13 at 19:26
1  
Put it this way: whether the code for GetParsedEntity is inlined into the public method or not shouldn't affect the test. That's an implementation detail. So if you're not breaking anything, just adding a new piece of functionality which is tested separately, what's your concern? Seems reasonable to me. –  Jon Skeet Oct 16 '13 at 19:54
1  
The key is not to be interested in the implementation when you design your tests. You should be interested in the effect that the documentation/contract describes. Separate "what it's meant to achieve" from "how it's meant to achieve it". (That's where using fakes instead of mocks comes in handy, too...) –  Jon Skeet Oct 16 '13 at 20:34
1  
@andymaster01: while we're on mocks/fakes topic, you might want to give this question a read. Long story short, the difference between mock and fake is rather blurry nowadays. –  jimmy_keen Oct 16 '13 at 20:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem that I'm seeing with this approach is that, because the code is testing not only the test subject (the public method) but also the private methods, is not clear which should be the test result by looking at the test subject (public method).

The test subject you mention has no visible effect without knowing its full contract. What the full contract here is? The mentioned public method and constructor, which takes dependency. It's the dependency that's important here and interaction with this dependency is what should be tested. Private methods are (as always) implementation detail - irrelevant to unit testing.

Having said that, let's get back to the contract. What is the actual contract of test subject (ChangeService method)? To retrieve object from repository basing on some id, create different object and save the later in the same repository. And this is your test.

[Fact]
public void ChangeService_StoresNewEntityInRepository_BasedOnProvidedId()
{
    const string ExpectedName = "some name";
    var otherEntity = new OtherEntity { Name = ExpectedName };
    var mock = new Mock<IRepository>();
    var service = new ChangeService(mock.object);
    mock.Setup(m => m.GetEntityById(0)).Return(otherEntity);

    service.RegisterChange(0);

    mock.Verify(m => m.SaveEntity(It.Is<Entity>(e => e.Name == ExpectedName));
} 
share|improve this answer
    
So, it's OK that, even looking at the RegisterChange method you don't see a direct usage of the IRepository, but looking at the test there is a mock for that class? I think that's my main concern. Thanks. –  andymaster01 Oct 16 '13 at 20:36
1  
@andymaster01: It is OK. This is the way that this specific object works - it interacts with dependency, with no visible result (return value / state change) to outside world. To check whether its contract has been fulfilled, you ask the dependency, not the test object itself. –  jimmy_keen Oct 16 '13 at 20:45

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