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I have a list with several very big values set on purpose to differentiate those indexes, it looks like this:

a = [1.3, 2.1, 9999., 5., 3.7 ,6.6, 9999., 7.4, 9999., 3.5, 7, 1.2, 9999.]

I need to find the second largest value in that list which isn't equal to 9999. (in the case above it would be 7.4) in the most efficient way possible (my list can get quite big)

In this question Retrieve the two highest item from a list containing 100,000 integers the heapq.nlargest function is mentioned but since I have more than one value 9999. it wouldn't work.

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2  
Second largest, or largest not equal to 9999 ? – Justin Jasmann Oct 16 '13 at 20:12
1  
Largest not equal to 9999. I call it second largest because I think of all those 9999 values as the same thing, but perhaps this is a bit confusing. Should I edit the name of the question? – Gabriel Oct 16 '13 at 20:14
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is an alternate method:

>>> a = [1.3, 2.1, 9999., 5., 3.7 ,6.6, 9999., 7.4, 9999., 3.5, 7, 1.2, 9999.]
>>> sorted(set(a))[-2]
7.4
>>>

And, believe it or not, it is actually quite a lot faster than the accepted solution:

>>> from timeit import timeit
>>> timeit("a=range(10000000);print sorted(set(a))[-2]", number=10)
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
34.327036257401424
>>> # This is NPE's answer
>>> timeit("a=range(10000000);maxa = max(a);print max(val for val in a if val != maxa)", number=10)
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
9999998
53.22811809880869
>>>

Above is a test that runs 10 times and works with a list that contains 10,000,000 items. Unless there is a flaw in my test (which I don't think there is), the solution I gave is clearly much faster.

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I can't believe it! But it's working for me too. +1 for now! Perhaps range() gives an already-sorted list and therefore isn't 'fair'? – Aaron McDaid Oct 16 '13 at 20:55
    
I also tried a=[ i%10 for i in range(1000000) ]; and got the same results. Fascinating. – Aaron McDaid Oct 16 '13 at 21:00
    
@AaronMcDaid - Regardless of whether the list is sorted or not to begin with, Python still has to check it. After all, how does the computer know its sorted? I think I'm right in saying the computer can't, so it sorts the list anyways. Also, I gave NPE's answer a sorted list too, so all is fair. – iCodez Oct 16 '13 at 21:03
    
Usually people say quicksort has complexity N log N, but that's only on average. If the data is ordered in a really nasty way, the complexity jumps to N^2. Or it can be O(N) on data that's already in the right order (but this depends). So, yes, it has to sort it anyway, as you say. The issue is that perhaps the sorting completes much more quickly on your contrived dataset than it would on random data. – Aaron McDaid Oct 16 '13 at 21:07
    
Excellent, I've changed the accepted answer to this one since performance was at the center of the question and this is the one that performs the best. Thank you all! – Gabriel Oct 16 '13 at 22:56
>>> max(val for val in a if val != 9999)
7.4

This has O(n) time complexity.

If the 9999 isn't fixed, you can generalize this by using max(a) instead of 9999:

>>> maxa = max(a)
>>> max(val for val in a if val != maxa)
7.4

(Although I suspect this isn't what you want.)

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1  
Or if val != max(a) – TerryA Oct 16 '13 at 20:11
    
Just make sure you call max(a) outside for the generator. – Peter DeGlopper Oct 16 '13 at 20:12
a = set([1.3, 2.1, 9999., 5., 3.7 ,6.6, 9999., 7.4, 9999., 3.5, 7, 1.2, 9999.])
a.remove(max(a))
print max(a)

This uses set to make sure that we deal with only unique items and then we remove the maximum value, so that next time when we call max, we ll be left with the second best maximum number.

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If you want to use numpy you can use masked arrays to skip 'bad' values:

import numpy as np
a = np.array([1.3, 2.1, 9999., 5., 3.7 ,6.6, 9999., 7.4, 9999., 3.5, 7, 1.2, 9999.])
ma = np.ma.masked_values(a, 9999., copy=False)
ma.max()
7.4

you can easily add exclusions to your mask:

ma = np.ma.masked_values(ma, 7.4, copy=False)
ma.max()
7.0
ma.mask[ma>=5]=True   
ma.max()
3.7
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