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I'm creating a binary tree that imports a list of enzymes like this entire line

"AarI/CACCTGCNNNN'NNNN/'NNNNNNNNGCAGGTG//"

and insertion works fine, display whats stored in the tree shows that it has correctly imported the contents from a file, but when searching for each line stored I get a return of not found except for the last insertion imported that's the only one returning true that insertion being "Zsp2I/ATGCA'T//" not sure what is wrong with the search function?

 template <class T>
 typename Tree<T>::node *Tree<T>::searchTree(T key)
     {
      cout << "searching for...key: " << key << endl;
       return search(key, root);
     }
 template <class T>
 typename Tree<T>::node *Tree<T>::search(T key, node*leaf)
     {
       if(leaf != NULL)
       {
        // cout << "check passed for search!" << endl;
         if(key == leaf->keyValue)
         {
            cout << "Found!" << endl;
            return leaf;
         }
         if(key < leaf->keyValue)
         {
           return search(key, leaf->left);
         }
         else
         {
           return search(key, leaf->right);
         }

       }

       else 
       {
         cout << key << " Not found...!" << endl;
         return NULL;
       }
     }

Fixed problem, search problem due to invisible characters upon importation of file. Fixed using a search method involving finding substrings.

 typename Tree<T>::node *Tree<T>::search(T key, node*leaf)
  {
    T DATA;

   if(leaf != NULL)
   {
     DATA = leaf->keyValue;


    if(DATA.find(key) != std::string::npos)
    {
       cout << "Found!" << key << endl;
       return leaf;
    }
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1  
Uhm... std::set and std::map are both balanced binary trees, why don't you use them? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 16 '13 at 20:10
1  
Hi. Asking people to spot errors in your code is not especially productive. You should use the debugger (or add print statements) to isolate the problem, by tracing the progress of your program, and comparing it to what you expect to happen. As soon as the two diverge, then you've found your problem. (And then if necessary, you should construct a minimal test-case.) –  Oliver Charlesworth Oct 16 '13 at 20:11
2  
Your search routine looks reasonable. My guess is, the problem is with insertion; it violates the assumptions that search makes. –  Igor Tandetnik Oct 16 '13 at 20:16
    
I am with @IgorTandetnik on this one. –  NPE Oct 16 '13 at 20:17
    
Here is example of the search being performed LEAF IS NOT NULL LEAF V IS :XhoI/C'TCGAG// key->XmaI/C'CCGGG//is greater than leaf->XhoI/C'TCGAG// LEAF IS NOT NULL LEAF V IS :XhoII/R'GATCY// key->XmaI/C'CCGGG//is greater than leaf->XhoII/R'GATCY// LEAF IS NOT NULL LEAF V IS :XmaI/C'CCGGG// key->XmaI/C'CCGGG//is less than leaf->XmaI/C'CCGGG// –  SxMZ Oct 16 '13 at 20:40

1 Answer 1

Importing lines from files can lead to importation of invisible characters that will leave string comparison of identical values to return false. For my search function one approach to resolving this issue is to search within the given string with string1.find(string2) being compared to return found.

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