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Is it possible to inherit signals from a base class and in the derived class connect methods to them? If yes, how?

Working testcase with composition

Instantiates a MyObject in a MyWidget, and in the widget reacts to a signal emitted by the object.

from PySide.QtGui import QApplication, QMainWindow
from PySide.QtCore import QObject, QTimer, Signal
from PySide.QtGui import QLabel

class MyObject(QObject):
    sig = Signal()

    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        QTimer.singleShot(3000, self.alert)
        QTimer.singleShot(5000, self.exit)
    def alert(self):
        self.sig.emit()
    def exit(self):
        print('All done')
        exit(0)

class MyWidget(QLabel):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        self.monitor = MyObject(self)
        self.monitor.sig.connect(self.update)
    def update(self):
        print(2)

app = QApplication([])
w = MyWidget()
w.show()
app.exec_()

It is a small but working example that opens a minimal, empty window, the self.monitor object instantiated by the widget emits a timer signal after 3 and 5 seconds. The first prompts the widget to just print a number to the console, the second signal causes the application to quit.

Failing testcase with inheritance

For inheritance only the widget class is changed to:

class MyWidget(MyObject, QLabel):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        self.sig.connect(self.update)
    def update(self):
        print(2)

If this is run in the console nothing is printed but a Segmentation Fault happens. Why? And can this be salvaged?

Salvaged by replacing super()

Interestingly, if both classes are changed to not use super(), the example works again:

class MyObject(QObject):
    sig = Signal()

    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QObject.__init__(self, parent)
        QTimer.singleShot(3000, self.alert)
        QTimer.singleShot(5000, self.exit)
    def alert(self):
        self.sig.emit()
    def exit(self):
        print('All done')
        exit(0)

class MyWidget(MyObject, QLabel):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        MyObject.__init__(self, parent)
        QLabel.__init__(self, parent)
        self.sig.connect(self.update)
    def update(self):
        print(2)

Generally I prefer to use super(), but maybe I need to reconsider? I've purposefully linked to two controversial articles about the usage of super() in Python. And now would be interested in how to use super() properly with pyside, or in explanations why it doesn't work in pyside at all.

Minor update: When using inheritance and super() but removing all signal related code the example works in that it does open up the window and does not segfault. So there seems to be some indication that the combination of super() initialization and signals causes a problem.

Minor update2: ..and when commenting out the self.sig.connect the window starts up and only segfaults when the 5-second signal fires to exit the application.

(This is Qt 4.8.4, Pyside 1.1.2 on an Ubuntu 13.04 system with a CPython 3.3.1 interpreter)

share|improve this question
    
does it crash or exit cleanly? and I think sig.connect() is sufficient as the signal should be a class level not instatiation level attribute. –  tcaswell Oct 17 '13 at 3:56
    
@tcaswell: Segfault by my definition is a crash and no clean exit. Signals are always connected between objects. This doc is not explicit about it, but lists no alternative. And, thinking about it, it does not make sense to connect signals and slots for classes, because that would imply that all objects of those classes are connected. Instances can be connected and talk to each other, classes are just typedefs in that regard. Types could define a protocol how to talk to each other, but they couldn't actually communicate. Objects do. –  cfi Oct 17 '13 at 8:14
    
It was not clear that you were getting seg-faults. There is deep magic being done by the wrapper layer to map the python to the c++ and back. If you are getting seg-faults you are pushing the c++ layer into a bad state. –  tcaswell Oct 17 '13 at 15:46
    
looking at this more carefully, I suspect the problem is that you are getting diamond-diagrams in the c++ layer. Even though python can cope with it, the pyside objects are a thin wrapper around the c++ objects and their instantiation is getting messed up. my understanding of super is that it is like const correctness in c++ in that it works great if you use it everywhere and causes great pain if you only use it sometimes. –  tcaswell Oct 17 '13 at 16:30
    
That is, I think if you don't mix in QLabel it will work. –  tcaswell Oct 17 '13 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only solution - or rather workaround - I could come up with so far that satisfies the criteria (a) inheritance and (b) use of super() is to prevent the diamond relationship as inspired by a comment by user tcaswell.

For my use case it is essential to retain the inheritance of any consumer classes (for custom widgets). On the other hand it is guaranteed - currently - that all consuming classes will be derived (indirectly) from QObject. Therefore there's no need to derive MyObject from QObject, though this in fact creates a true abstract MixIn class: It is not usable standalone and has interface requirements to consuming classes. I'm not sure if I like it.

Here's the working code:

from PySide.QtGui import QApplication, QMainWindow
from PySide.QtCore import QObject, QTimer, Signal
from PySide.QtGui import QLabel

class MyObject:
    sig = Signal()

    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        QTimer.singleShot(3000, self.alert)
        QTimer.singleShot(5000, self.exit)
    def alert(self):
        self.sig.emit()
    def exit(self):
        print('All done')
        exit(0)

class MyWidget(MyObject, QLabel):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        self.sig.connect(self.update)
    def update(self):
        print(2)


app = QApplication([])

w = MyWidget()
w.show()


app.exec_()
share|improve this answer

Qt does not support multiple inheritance from QObjects, and the same limitation applies to PySide and PyQt. Although there are sometimes ways to work around this limitation, it is generally a bad idea to attempt to create subclasses with two or more QObject base classes.

For the inheritance of signals, using a simple non-QObject mixin is probably the best way to go - although I think this solution will only work with PySide; for PyQt, signals can only be defined on QObject subclasses.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah. That's an interesting tidbit of info on PyQt! I'm glad to get this little advantage from pyside. –  cfi Oct 18 '13 at 18:58

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