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I'm writing a bash script which will input arguments, the command would look like this:

command -a -b -c file -d -e

I would like to detect a specific argument (-b) with its specific location ($1, $2, $3)

#! /bin/bash
counter=0
while [ counter -lt $# ]
do
    if [ $($counter) == "-b" ]
    then
        found=$counter
    fi
    let counter+=1
done

The problem rises in $($counter). Is there a way to use $counter to call the value of an argument? For instance if counter=2, I would like to call the value of argument $2. $($counter) doesn't work.

share|improve this question
2  
Use getopts for this. For example stackoverflow.com/a/14203146/1983854 can help. – fedorqui Oct 16 '13 at 22:54
    
ok thanks! I'll look into it, but if I want the following filename, for instance -b filename, does getopts also provide this function? – Michael Ho Chum Oct 16 '13 at 22:57
    
Yes it does. Did you look at the documentation? – Carl Norum Oct 16 '13 at 22:57
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can accomplish this without getopts (which is still recommended, though) by reworking your loop.

counter=1
for i in "$@"; do
  if [[ $i == -b ]]; then
      break
  fi
  ((counter+=1))
done

Simply iterate over the arguments directly, rather than iterating over the argument positions.


bash also does allow indirect parameter expansion, using the following syntax:

#! /bin/bash
counter=0
while [ counter -lt $# ]
do
    if [ ${!counter} = "-b" ]  # ${!x} uses the value of x as the parameter name
    then
        found=$counter
    fi
    let counter+=1
done
share|improve this answer
1  
Don't use == with single-bracket notation, bash accepts it but it's not POSIX-conforming and other shells choke on it. +1 for the rest! – Adrian Frühwirth Oct 17 '13 at 13:38
    
Non-POSIX shells will probably choke on ${!counter} anyway :) But you are correct in general. – chepner Oct 17 '13 at 13:52
    
You got a point there ;-) – Adrian Frühwirth Oct 18 '13 at 6:33

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