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I'm using the standard logger from java.util.logging and by default the console output is directed to the error stream (i.e. System.err). How do I change the console output to the output stream (i.e. System.out)

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10 Answers 10

I figured out one way. First remove the default console handler:

setUseParentHandlers(false);

Then subclass ConsoleHandler and in the constructor:

setOutputStream(System.out);

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3  
You better wrap System.out with self implemented OutputStream to avoid closing it on the next call to setOutputStream(...) or LogManager.reset(). –  amotzg Sep 27 '12 at 3:54
    
Also, take care to not call the super constructor (of ConsoleHandler) since it sets System.err and you will close it when calling setOutputStream(System.out). Or, you can just subclass StreamHandler and call super( OutputStream, Formatter). –  amotzg Sep 27 '12 at 3:58
Handler consoleHandler = new Handler(){
         @Override
            public void publish(LogRecord record)
            {
                if (getFormatter() == null)
                {
                    setFormatter(new SimpleFormatter());
                }

                try {
                    String message = getFormatter().format(record);
                    if (record.getLevel().intValue() >= Level.WARNING.intValue())
                    {
                        System.err.write(message.getBytes());                       
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        System.out.write(message.getBytes());
                    }
                } catch (Exception exception) {
                    reportError(null, exception, ErrorManager.FORMAT_FAILURE);
                }

            }

            @Override
            public void close() throws SecurityException {}
            @Override
            public void flush(){}
        };
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1  
But, in the modern days... is there a way to do this without implementing a custom Handler?? –  Victor Aug 25 '13 at 20:19

I've arrived at

 SimpleFormatter fmt = new SimpleFormatter();
 StreamHandler sh = new StreamHandler(System.out, fmt);
 logger.addHandler(sh);
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1  
This does not disable the default handler. Just follow the answer stackoverflow.com/a/2533250/873282 –  koppor Nov 17 '12 at 20:36

Hmm I just got bit in the foot a few times, trying to accomplish this feat. Before googling my way here I managed to conjure the following hack. Ugly, but it seems to get the job done.

public class StdoutConsoleHandler extends ConsoleHandler {
  protected void setOutputStream(OutputStream out) throws SecurityException {
    super.setOutputStream(System.out); // kitten killed here :-(
  }
}

Watch out: Calling setOutputStream() from the constructor is tempting, but it does (as Jon Skeet already pointed out) close System.err. Mad skills!

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Have a look at the docs and source for ConsoleHandler - I'm sure you could easily write a version which just uses System.err instead of System.out. (It's a shame that ConsoleHandler doesn't allow this to be configured, to be honest.)

Then it's just a case of configuring the logging system to use your new StdoutHandler (or whatever you call it) in the normal way.

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I think ConsoleHandler is the default, there is a StreamHandler that can print to any other stream. –  Uri Oct 11 '08 at 15:30
2  
Yes, but you'd want to subclass StreamHandler so as to avoid trying to close System.err, I suspect. –  Jon Skeet Oct 11 '08 at 17:59

If there is still someone out there looking for a solution to this problem. Here's what I came up with finally: I just subclassed StreamHandler and added an additional parameter MaxLevel, which is checked at the beginning of publish(). If the level of the logging event is larger than MaxLevel, publish won't be executed any further. Here are the details:

MaxlevelStreamHandler.java Main Class below.

package helper;

/**
 * The only difference to the standard StreamHandler is 
 * that a MAXLEVEL can be defined (which then is not published)
 * 
 * @author Kai Goergen
 */

import java.io.PrintStream;
import java.util.logging.Formatter;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.LogRecord;
import java.util.logging.StreamHandler;

public class MaxlevelStreamHandler extends StreamHandler {

    private Level maxlevel = Level.SEVERE;  // by default, put out everything

    /**
     * The only method we really change to check whether the message
     * is smaller than maxlevel.
     * We also flush here to make sure that the message is shown immediately.
     */
    @Override
    public synchronized void publish(LogRecord record) {
        if (record.getLevel().intValue() > this.maxlevel.intValue()) {
            // do nothing if the level is above maxlevel
        } else {
            // if we arrived here, do what we always do
            super.publish(record);
            super.flush();
        }
    }

    /**
     * getter for maxlevel
     * @return
     */
    public Level getMaxlevel() {
        return maxlevel;
    }

    /**
     * Setter for maxlevel. 
     * If a logging event is larger than this level, it won't be displayed
     * @param maxlevel
     */
    public void setMaxlevel(Level maxlevel) {
        this.maxlevel = maxlevel;
    }

    /** Constructor forwarding */
    public MaxlevelStreamHandler(PrintStream out, Formatter formatter) {
        super(out, formatter);
    }

    /** Constructor forwarding */
    public MaxlevelStreamHandler() {
        super();
    }
}

Main Class

To now show some events in stdout and some in stderr, simply setup two StreamLoggers, one for critical events and one for all others, and disable the standard console logger:

// setup all logs that are smaller than WARNINGS to stdout
MaxlevelStreamHandler outSh = new MaxlevelStreamHandler(System.out, formatter);
outSh.setLevel(Level.ALL);
outSh.setMaxlevel(Level.INFO);
logger.addHandler(outSh);

// setup all warnings to stdout & warnings and higher to stderr
StreamHandler errSh = new StreamHandler(System.err, formatter);
errSh.setLevel(Level.WARNING);
logger.addHandler(errSh);

// remove default console logger
logger.setUseParentHandlers(false);

logger.info("info");
logger.warning("warning");
logger.severe("severe");

Hope this helps!

Update: I added super.flush() right after super.publish() to make sure that the message is shown immediately. Before, I had problems that the log-messages were always shown at the end. It's now part of the code above.

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If you use Java logging, you can change the default handler:

For example, for files: Handler fh = new FileHandler(FILENAME); Logger.getLogger(LOGGER_NAME).addHandler(fh);

If you want to output to a stream you can use StreamHandler, I think you can configure it with any output stream that you woud like, including the system stream.

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If you set setUseParentHandlers(false); only THAT class has it set. Other classes in the app will still pass it thru to stderr.

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If one does that for the root logging class (Logger.GLOBAL_LOGGER_NAME), console logging is disabled for all classes. –  koppor Nov 17 '12 at 20:44

I had a similar problem. I wanted to log INFO and below to System.out, and WARNING and above to System.err. Here is the solution I implemented:

public class DualConsoleHandler extends StreamHandler {

    private final ConsoleHandler stderrHandler = new ConsoleHandler();

    public DualConsoleHandler() {
        super(System.out, new SimpleFormatter());
    }

    @Override
    public void publish(LogRecord record) {
        if (record.getLevel().intValue() <= Level.INFO.intValue()) {
            super.publish(record);
            super.flush();
        } else {
            stderrHandler.publish(record);
            stderrHandler.flush();
        }
    }
}

Of course, you could make it more flexible by factoring out the hard-coded reference to Level.INFO, for example. But this worked well for me to get some basic dual-stream logging. (BTW, the tips about not subclassing ConsoleHandler to avoid closing the System.err were very useful.)

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Simply extend StreamHandler & in the constructor call Super(System.out,). This will avoid closing System.err - Thanks

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