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For a simple RESTful JSON api implemented in Spring MVC, can I use Bean Validation (JSR-303) to validate the path variables passed into the handler method?

For example:

 @RequestMapping(value = "/number/{customerNumber}")
 @ResponseBody
 public ResponseObject searchByNumber(@PathVariable("customerNumber") String customerNumber) {
 ...
 }

Here, I need to validate the customerNumber variables's length using Bean validation. Is this possible with Spring MVC v3.x.x? If not, what's the best approach for this type of validations?

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Spring does not support @Valid on @PathVariable annotated parameters in handler methods. There was an Improvement request, but it is still unresolved.

Your best bet is to just do your custom validation in the handler method body.

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Path variable may not be linked with any bean in your system. What do you want to annotate with JSR-303 annotations? To validate path variable you should use this approach Problem validating @PathVariable url on spring 3 mvc

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The link you've given says: "If the PathVariable parameter fails validation, then Spring will add the error to the request's BindingResult automatically, you don't need to do that yourself." Does that mean bean validation is possible on @PathVariable params? It doesn't clearly say whether it is possible or not. May be I'm mis-understanding. I've tried it the same way as suggested but the Binding result does not have any errors when validation fails. –  Grover Oct 17 '13 at 23:14

@PathVariable is not meant to be validated in order to send back a readable message to the user. As principle a pathVariable should never be invalid. If a pathVariable is invalid the reason can be:

  1. a bug generated a bad url (an href in jsp for example). No @Valid is needed and no message is needed, just fix the code;
  2. "the user" is manipulating the url. Again, no @Valid is needed, no meaningful message to the user should be given.

In both cases just leave an exception bubble up until it is catched by the usual Spring ExceptionHandlers in order to generate a nice error page or a meaningful json response indicating the error. In order to get this result you can do some validation using custom editors.

Create a CustomerNumber class, possibly as immutable (implementing a CharSequence is not needed but allows you to use it basically as if it were a String)

public class CustomerNumber implements CharSequence {

    private String customerNumber;

    public CustomerNumber(String customerNumber) {
        this.customerNumber = customerNumber;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return customerNumber == null ? null : customerNumber.toString();
    }

    @Override
    public int length() {
        return customerNumber.length();
    }

    @Override
    public char charAt(int index) {
        return customerNumber.charAt(index);
    }

    @Override
    public CharSequence subSequence(int start, int end) {
        return customerNumber.subSequence(start, end);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        return customerNumber.equals(obj);
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return customerNumber.hashCode();
    }
}

Create an editor implementing your validation logic (in this case no whitespaces and fixed length, just as an example)

public class CustomerNumberEditor extends PropertyEditorSupport {

    @Override
    public void setAsText(String text) throws IllegalArgumentException {

        if (StringUtils.hasText(text) && !StringUtils.containsWhitespace(text) && text.length() == YOUR_LENGTH) {
            setValue(new CustomerNumber(text));
        } else {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
            // you could also subclass and throw IllegalArgumentException
            // in order to manage a more detailed error message
        }
    }

    @Override
    public String getAsText() {
        return ((CustomerNumber) this.getValue()).toString();
    }
}

Register the editor in the Controller

@InitBinder
public void initBinder(WebDataBinder binder) {

    binder.registerCustomEditor(CustomerNumber.class, new CustomerNumberEditor());
    // ... other editors
}

Change the signature of your controller method accepting CustomerNumber instead of String (whatever your ResponseObject is ...)

@RequestMapping(value = "/number/{customerNumber}")
@ResponseBody
public ResponseObject searchByNumber(@PathVariable("customerNumber") CustomerNumber customerNumber) {
    ...
}
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