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I somewhat understand descendant selectors, but the more complex examples are giving me trouble. For example:

#content .alternative p

Should this rule apply to p elements that are descendants of elements E, where E are :

  • descendants of element #content and
  • are also members of class .alternative

Or should rule apply to p elements that are:

  • descendants of element #content
  • and are also members of class .alternative?

How about the following rule?

#content .alternative .alternative1 p
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The right most component of the selector is the part that actually picks the element. A space is a descendant selector. If there isn't a space then the selectors all apply to one element.

#content .alternative p

p element contained in an element of class alternative contained in an element of id content.

#content .alternative .alternative1 p

p element contained in an element of class alternative1 contained in an element of class alternative contained in an element of id content.

#content p.alternative.alternative1

p element of class alternative1 and of class alternative contained in an element of id content.

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thank you all for helping me –  carewithl Dec 21 '09 at 19:49

About the first question: applies to p elements that are: descendants of element #content and also descendants of elements with class .alternative

The second one is the same, just with an extra level of depth.

Check this link for more info on selectors

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4  
also .alternative has to be a descendant of #content –  Neil Sarkar Dec 21 '09 at 19:28

Each section of the specifier separated by a space refers to a separate node in the document. So its the first one.

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The first one is the correct description. Your second interpretation would be written in CSS as:

#content p.alternative

Since the .alternative is attached to the p in that version, it's a qualifier rather than specifying a descendent. If you instead write it as

#content p .alternative

it would mean elements of class .alternative that are descendents of p elements that are descendents of the #content element.

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