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I'm reading a book (Secrets.of.the.JavaScript.Ninja) which Proposing a syntax that is used to accomplish an inheritance scheme.

Which will allow me to do :

var Person = Object.subClass(
{
          init: function (isDancing)
          {
              this.dancing = isDancing;
          } 
});


var Ninja = Person.subClass(
{
    init: function ()
    {
        this._super(false);
    } 
});

And here is the implementation code :

/*1*/   (function ()
/*2*/   {
/*3*/       var initializing = false,
/*4*/           superPattern =
/*5*/               /xyz/.test(function ()   {   xyz; }) ? /\b_super\b/ : /.*/;
/*6*/     
/*7*/       Object.subClass = function (properties)
/*8*/       {
/*9*/           var _super = this.prototype;
/*10*/           initializing = true;
/*11*/           var proto = new this();
/*12*/           initializing = false;
/*13*/           for (var name in properties)
/*14*/           {
/*15*/               proto[name] = typeof properties[name] == "function" &&
/*16*/                   typeof _super[name] == "function" &&
/*17*/                   superPattern.test(properties[name]) ?
/*18*/                   (function (name, fn)
/*19*/               {
/*20*/                   return function ()
/*21*/                   {
/*22*/                       var tmp = this._super;
/*23*/                       this._super = _super[name];
/*24*/                       var ret = fn.apply(this, arguments);
/*25*/                       this._super = tmp;
/*26*/                       return ret;
/*27*/                   };
/*28*/               })(name, properties[name]) :
/*29*/                   properties[name];
/*30*/           }
/*31*/   
/*32*/           function Class()
/*33*/           {
/*34*/               // All construction is actually done in the init method
/*35*/               if (!initializing && this.init)
/*36*/   
/*37*/                   this.init.apply(this, arguments);
/*38*/           }
/*39*/           Class.prototype = proto;
/*40*/           Class.constructor = Class;
/*41*/           Class.subClass = arguments.callee;
/*42*/           return Class;
/*43*/       };
/*44*/   })();

My question is about line #5 :

I know that : the test() method expects a string, which triggers the function’s toString() method

But why didn't he use the simple toString method ?

function getStringFromFunction(fn)
{
  return fn.toString();      
}

What am I missing ? I'm pretty sure there is a reason for using this regex and not simple toString...

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suppose he is concerned with this issue: http://my.opera.com/hallvors/blog/show.dml/1665828 since John Resig is explicitly called out by the author.

At the same time Function.prototype.toString() is part of the ECMAScript spec and according to this answer it's quite safe to use.

share|improve this answer
    
off-topic (a bit) Q : but what if someone overrides .toString() ? I thought I should do Object.prototype.toString.apply(function a(b){c;}) but it returns : "[object Function]" ( and i want it to return the string representation) . is there any way i can use the pure toString method ? ( without being afraid that toString was overridden) ? –  Royi Namir Oct 17 '13 at 8:22
    
@RoyiNamir - unfortunately I don't know any way to do this. –  kamituel Oct 17 '13 at 8:48
    
I found it : Function.prototype.toString.apply(function a(b){c;}) –  Royi Namir Oct 17 '13 at 8:51
    
@RoyiNamir - aah, okay. I thought you want Object.prototype.toString to work after it was overriden. –  kamituel Oct 17 '13 at 8:55

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