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Using C#, I am noticing a significant difference in perfomance when populating a list with instances of a dynamically generated type versus a simple struct. The code below includes 4 different methods for populating a list with 100,000 objects.

Each method performs differently:

Button1: 15 milliseconds

Button2: 31 milliseconds

Button3 & 4: 300 milliseconds

Note, the code for button 3 & 4 came from this topic

Could anyone explain why the dynamically created object is slower?

    public struct DataRow
    {
        public double t;
        public double vf;
        public double im;

        public double T { get { return t; } set { t = value; } }
        public double Vf { get { return vf; } set { vf = value; } }
        public double Im { get { return im; } set { im = value; } }
    }

    //Use struct defined above
    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        int n = 0;

        //adding rows
        List<DataRow> myTable = new List<DataRow>();
        DataRow myRow = new DataRow();

        start = DateTime.Now;

        while (n < 100000)
        {
            myRow.T = n * 1.0;
            myRow.Vf = 2.0;
            myRow.Im = 4.0;

            myTable.Add(myRow);

            n++;
        }
        end = DateTime.Now;
        System.TimeSpan diff = end.Subtract(start);
        label2.Text = diff.Seconds.ToString();
        label4.Text = diff.Milliseconds.ToString();

        dataGridView1.DataSource = myTable;
    }

    //define the list as it is done on buttons 3 & 4 but use the static struct
    private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Type myType = typeof(DataRow);

        Type listType = typeof(List<>);

        Type myListType = listType.MakeGenericType(myType);

        IList myTable = (IList)Activator.CreateInstance(myListType);

        DataRow bRow = new DataRow();

        int n = 0;
        start = DateTime.Now;
        while (n < 100000)
        {
            bRow.t = n * 1.0;
            bRow.vf = 2.0;
            bRow.im = 4.0;
            myTable.Add(bRow);

            n++;
        }
        end = DateTime.Now;
        System.TimeSpan diff = end.Subtract(start);
        label2.Text = diff.Seconds.ToString();
        label4.Text = diff.Milliseconds.ToString();
        dataGridView1.DataSource = myTable;

    }

    //Create assy at runtime and load dll
    private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Type myType = CreateDynRow();
        Assembly myAssy = Assembly.LoadFrom("DynaRowAssy.dll");
        Type myRow = myAssy.GetType("DynaRow");

        Type listType = typeof(List<>);

        Type myListType = listType.MakeGenericType(myRow);

        IList myTable = (IList)Activator.CreateInstance(myListType);

        FieldInfo piT = myRow.GetField("t");
        FieldInfo piVf = myRow.GetField("vf");
        FieldInfo piIm = myRow.GetField("im");

        ValueType aRow = (ValueType)Activator.CreateInstance(myRow);

        int n = 0;
        start = DateTime.Now;
        while (n < 100000)
        {
            piT.SetValue(aRow, 1 * n);
            piVf.SetValue(aRow, 2.0);
            piIm.SetValue(aRow, 4.0);
            myTable.Add(aRow);

            n++;
        }
        end = DateTime.Now;
        System.TimeSpan diff = end.Subtract(start);
        label2.Text = diff.Seconds.ToString();
        label4.Text = diff.Milliseconds.ToString();
        dataGridView1.DataSource = myTable;
    }

    //create assy at runtime in memory
    private void button4_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        //build the assembly
        Type myType = CreateDynRow();

        Type listType = typeof(List<>);

        Type myListType = listType.MakeGenericType(myType);

        IList myTable = (IList)Activator.CreateInstance(myListType);

        FieldInfo piT = myType.GetField("t");
        FieldInfo piVf = myType.GetField("vf");
        FieldInfo piIm = myType.GetField("im");

        ValueType aRow = (ValueType)Activator.CreateInstance(myType);

        int n = 0;
        start = DateTime.Now;
        while (n < 100000)
        {
            piT.SetValue(aRow, 1 * n);
            piVf.SetValue(aRow, 2.0);
            piIm.SetValue(aRow, 4.0);
            myTable.Add(aRow);

            n++;
        }
        end = DateTime.Now;
        System.TimeSpan diff = end.Subtract(start);
        label2.Text = diff.Seconds.ToString();
        label4.Text = diff.Milliseconds.ToString();
        dataGridView1.DataSource = myTable;
    }
share|improve this question
5  
Just a tip: the resolution of DateTime is around 15 milliseconds, so when you time things using DateTime.Now, two things that actually perform very similarly may appear different by up to 15ms just due to being slightly different sides of a rounding boundary. So if you have benchmarks that run down around the 15-30ms mark, either run more iterations (so that a 15ms rounding error becomes insignificant) or use a higher-res timer like System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch (the latter has a slightly more convenient API too!). – itowlson Dec 21 '09 at 19:43
up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's not (primarily) the dynamic creation: it's the use of reflection (FieldInfo.SetValue) that makes the button3 and button4 versions slower than when the calls can be compiled in.

A possible way around this is to declare an interface that your code can compile against, and have the dynamic type implement this interface. You'll still take a small hit instantiating and querying the dynamic type for that interface via reflection, but after that it should be as fast as the "static" references.

share|improve this answer
2  
You can also get around this by using System.Expressions, so you'll only have to do reflection once for your whole set of objects. – Jan Jongboom Dec 21 '09 at 19:56
1  
Also, if you have to use reflection and make many repeated calls, consider creating a delegate and using that. msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2008/08/09/… – Mark Simpson Dec 22 '09 at 17:28

Simple Answer: More code is being executed to dynamicaly create the object.

Reflection is always going to be slower than defining the type up front and then working with that object directly. You're asking the runtime to do a lot more work for you rather than specifying everything up front. Depending on which Reflection features you're using...your code will be slower.

If you want the specifics, examine the IL that your code generates. That should give you the whole story.

share|improve this answer

Here's what we came up with. It is almost as fast as the statically defined case:

// Dynamically create DataRow derived from ValueType, 
// List of DataRows, 
// Delegates to properties
//  

private void button4_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Type myType = CreateDynRow();  // dynamic version of DataRow, see above
    Type myListType = typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(myType);
    IList myTable = (IList)Activator.CreateInstance(myListType);
    ValueType myRowBuffer = (ValueType)Activator.CreateInstance(myType);

    var mySet_TDelegate = myRowBuffer.GetInstanceInvoker<Action<Double>>("set_T");
    var mySet_ImDelegate = myRowBuffer.GetInstanceInvoker<Action<Double>>("set_Im");
    var mySet_VfDelegate = myRowBuffer.GetInstanceInvoker<Action<Double>>("set_Vf");

    stopWatch.Reset();
    stopWatch.Start();
    for (int n = 0; n < rowCount; n++)
    {
        mySet_TDelegate(1.0 * n);
        mySet_ImDelegate(4.0);
        mySet_VfDelegate(2.0);

        myTable.Add(myRowBuffer);
    }
    stopWatch.Stop();
    label1.Text = String.Format("{0}", stopWatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    dataGridView1.DataSource = myTable;
}

Thanks for your help. By the way, we got here using Justin's & Mark's answers. And GetInstanceInvoker is from Kenneth Xu's Common.Reflection class.

share|improve this answer

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