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module Main where

import           Graphics.Rendering.OpenGL

data Shaders = Shaders {  vertexShader   :: VertexShader
                    , fragmentShader :: FragmentShader
                    , program'       :: Program
                    , positionA      :: AttribLocation }

data Resources = Resources {  vertexBuffer  :: BufferObject
                        , elementBuffer :: BufferObject
                        , shaders       :: Shaders
                        , fadeFactor    :: GLfloat }


main :: IO ()
main = do
  putStrLn "test"

Here's the ghci output:

[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( /home/madjestic/Projects/Haskell/OpenGL/triangle_02/Main_test.hs, interpreted )

/home/madjestic/Projects/Haskell/OpenGL/triangle_02/Main_test.hs:11:45:
    Not in scope: type constructor or class `VertexShader'
    A data constructor of that name is in scope; did you mean -XDataKinds?

/home/madjestic/Projects/Haskell/OpenGL/triangle_02/Main_test.hs:12:45:
    Not in scope: type constructor or class `FragmentShader'
    A data constructor of that name is in scope; did you mean -XDataKinds?
Failed, modules loaded: none.

The error states, that the type or class constructor is not in scope, but at the same time it sais that "A data constructor of that name is in scope...", but suggests to use DataKinds, which I don't understand why would I need one - the same code compiles ok on my older linux box, without DataKinds extension, but it does not seem to work in the new environment. I mostly rely on portage libraries now, while the old environment relied more on cabal libraries, I wonder if that's causing the difference? What is the problem here? The data type constructor live in Graphics.Rendering.OpenGL, which is being imported - how come ghc can't use it here?

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Check the versions of libraries you are using. There might be some api changes between the two systems. – Satvik Oct 17 '13 at 8:44
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The OpenGL library shader API changed between versions 2.8.0.0 and 2.9.0.0. The older version uses separate types for e.g. VertexShader and FragmentShader but the new version only uses a simple Shader type to store both programs.

You can either

  1. update your program to use the new API
  2. globally install the older version of OpenGL with cabal install OpenGL-2.8.0.0
  3. write a .cabal file for your project (if you don't have one already) and specify the OpenGL version in the dependencies to be < 2.9.0.0

If you are getting you library dependencies from your OS's package manager instead of cabal, then you are pretty much limited to option 1.

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