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I have the following Vertex struct in my OpenGL ES app :

typedef struct Vertex {
float Position[3];
float Color[4];
} Vertex;

In my header I then declare :

Vertex *Vertices;

Then in my init method :

 int array = 4;
 Vertices = (Vertex *)malloc(array * sizeof(Vertex));

I then later setup the mesh as follows, where vertices array in this case has 4 vertices :

- (void)setupMesh {
int count = 0;

for (VerticeObject * object in verticesArray) {

    Vertices[count].Position[0] = object.x;
    Vertices[count].Position[1] = object.y;
    Vertices[count].Position[2] = object.z;

    Vertices[count].Color[0] = 0.9f;
    Vertices[count].Color[1] = 0.9f;
    Vertices[count].Color[2] = 0.9f;
    Vertices[count].Color[3] = 1.0f;

    count ++;
    }
 }

Can anyone spot what I am doing wrong here ? When I pass this Vertices object to OpenGL nothing is drawn, whereas if I hard code the Vertices array as :

Vertex Vertices [] = {
{{0.0, 0.0, 0}, {0.9, 0.9, 0.9, 1}},
{{0.0 , 0.0 , 0}, {0.9, 0.9, 0.9, 1}},
{{0.0, 0.0, 0}, {0.9, 0.9, 0.9, 1}},
{{0.0, 0.0, 0}, {0.9, 0.9, 0.9, 1}},
};

Everything works ?

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When you inspect the first array in the debugger after initialization, does it look like what you'd expect? (Ie, does it look the same as the second case?) –  Ben Zotto Oct 17 '13 at 14:10
    
Also, how do you initialize verticesArray? –  micantox Oct 17 '13 at 14:12
    
Ben - yes - the array looks fine. –  GuybrushThreepwood Oct 17 '13 at 14:13
    
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSMutableArray * verticesArray; –  GuybrushThreepwood Oct 17 '13 at 14:14
    
VerticeObject * vertice1 = [[VerticeObject alloc]initWithXYZ:200 :0 :0]; VerticeObject * vertice2 = [[VerticeObject alloc]initWithXYZ:200 :50 :0]; VerticeObject * vertice3 = [[VerticeObject alloc]initWithXYZ:150 :50 :0]; VerticeObject * vertice4 = [[VerticeObject alloc]initWithXYZ:150 :0 :0]; NSMutableArray * vertices = [[NSMutableArray alloc]initWithObjects:vertice1, vertice2, vertice3, vertice4, nil]; –  GuybrushThreepwood Oct 17 '13 at 14:14
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the problem is that before you had a array allocated on the stack where now you have a pointer(memory address) to a block of memory on the heap. So when you wright stuff like sizeof(Vertices) your original sizeof(Vertices) would result in 4 vertices each holding 3 floats position and 4 floats color -> 4 * (3 + 4) * 4(float = 4 bytes) = 112 bytes. Where sizeof(aPointer) = 4 bytes. OpenGL is a C library an not super easy to work with so you should really brush up on you C skills before trying to get it running. Also there in a GLKView class now days that will make all the setup allot easier.

glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(Vertices), Vertices, GL_STATIC_DRAW);

Try to allocate same size as the array of vertices. In your case 4 * sizeof(Vertex).

glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(Vertex) * 4, Vertices, GL_STATIC_DRAW);

If that doesn't work you can easily fix the problem by replacing your dynamically allocated array for a statically allocated since you know at compile time how big it needs to be.

Vertex Vertices[4];

Then set the values in your loop as you do.

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