Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Java 8 introduced lambda functions and I want to implement something like factorial:

 IntToDoubleFunction fact = x -> { return  ( x == 0)?1:x* fact.applyAsDouble(x-1);};

Compilation returns

  src\Test.java:19: error: variable fact might not have been initialized
    IntToDoubleFunction fact = x -> { return  ( x == 0)?1:x* fact.applyAsDouble(x-1)
    ;};

How can I reference function itself. Class is anonymous but instance exists: It is called fact. ^

share|improve this question

12 Answers 12

One solution is to define this function as an INSTANCE attribute.

import java.util.function.*;
public class Test{

    IntToDoubleFunction fact = x -> { return  ( x == 0)?1:x* fact.applyAsDouble(x-1);};

    public static void main(String[] args) {
      Test test = new Test();
      test.doIt();
    }

    public void doIt(){
       System.out.println("fact(3)=" + fact.applyAsDouble(3));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
fact now gets an error saying: "The local variable f may not have been initialized" using oracle.com/technetwork/articles/java/lambda-1984522.html –  Ray Tayek Jan 16 '14 at 3:55

Local and anonymous classes, as well as lambdas, capture local variables by value when they are created. Therefore, it is impossible for them to refer to themselves by capturing a local variable, because the value for pointing to themself does not exist yet at the time they are being created.

Code in local and anonymous classes can still refer to themselves using this. However, this in a lambda does not refer to the lambda; it refers to the this from the outside scope.

You could capture a mutable data structure, like an array, instead:

IntToDoubleFunction[] foo = { null };
foo[0] = x -> { return  ( x == 0)?1:x* foo[0].applyAsDouble(x-1);};

though hardly an elegant solution.

share|improve this answer

One way is to write a secondary function, helper, which takes a function and a number as arguments, and then write the function you actually want, fact = helper(helper,x).

Like so:

BiFunction<BiFunction, Double, Double> factHelper =
        (f, x) -> (x == 0) ? 1.0 : x*(double)f.apply(f,x-1);
Function<Double, Double> fact =
        x -> factHelper.apply(factHelper, x);

This seems to me to be slightly more elegant than relying on corner case semantics like a closure that captures a reference to a mutable structure, or allowing self-reference with a warning of the possibility of "might not be initialized."

Still, it's not a perfect solution because of Java's type system -- the generics cannot guarantee that f, the argument to factHelper, is of the same type as factHelper (i.e. same input types and output types), since that would be an infinitely nested generic.

Thus, instead, a safer solution might be:

Function<Double, Double> fact = x -> {
    BiFunction<BiFunction, Double, Double> factHelper =
        (f, d) -> (d == 0) ? 1.0 : d*(double)f.apply(f,d-1);
    return factHelper.apply(factHelper, x);
};

The code smell incurred from factHelper's less-than-perfect generic type is now contained (or, dare I say, encapsulated) within the lambda, ensuring that factHelper will never be called unknowingly.

share|improve this answer

You can define a recursive lambda as an instance or class variable:

static DoubleUnaryOperator factorial = x -> x == 0 ? 1
                                          : x * factorial.applyAsDouble(x - 1);

for example:

class Test {
    static DoubleUnaryOperator factorial = x -> x == 0 ? 1
                                             : x * factorial.applyAsDouble(x - 1));
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(factorial.applyAsDouble(5));
    }
}

prints 120.0.

share|improve this answer
    
Right. The recursion feature on local variables was removed. See this email thread: mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/lambda-dev/2013-September/… –  Stuart Marks Feb 8 '14 at 18:11
    
@StuartMarks But it still works on instance/class variables, right? –  assylias Feb 8 '14 at 18:14
    
In simple cases, yes, but you get a warning about factorial potentially not being initialized. I don't believe there is actually a problem in this example, since the lambda cannot be called before it's initialized, but I'm sure someone could come up with a sufficiently complicated example that ended up observing a field in an uninitialized state. At some point it seems preferable to use named methods and method references. See my answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/21652054/1441122 –  Stuart Marks Feb 8 '14 at 21:37
public class Main {
    static class Wrapper {
        Function<Integer, Integer> f;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final Wrapper w = new Wrapper();
        w.f = x -> x == 0 ? 1 : x * w.f.apply(x - 1);
        System.out.println(w.f.apply(10));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

A bit like the very first reply ...

public static Function<Integer,Double> factorial;

static {
    factorial = n -> {
        assert n >= 0;
        return (n == 0) ? 1.0 : n * factorial.apply(n - 1);
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
All of the replies are basically the same. But why does Java require you to declare the Function as an instance or class variable? Why does it not allow you to just declare it in your method??? –  Victor Grazi Jul 28 '14 at 11:39

Another version using accumulator so that recursion can be optimised. Moved to Generic interface definition.

Function<Integer,Double> facts = x -> { return  ( x == 0)?1:x* facts.apply(x-1);};
BiFunction<Integer,Double,Double> factAcc= (x,acc) -> { return (x == 0)?acc:factAcc.apply(x- 1,acc*x);};
Function<Integer,Double> fact = x -> factAcc.apply(x,1.0) ;

public static void main(String[] args) {
   Test test = new Test();
   test.doIt();
}

 public void doIt(){
int val=70;
System.out.println("fact(" + val + ")=" + fact.apply(val));
}
}
share|improve this answer

I don't have a Java8 compiler handy, so can't test my answer. But will it work if you define the 'fact' variable to be final?

final IntToDoubleFunction fact = x -> { return ( x == 0)?1:x* fact.applyAsDouble(x-1);};

share|improve this answer

The following works but it does seem arcane.

import java.util.function.Function;

class recursion{

Function<Integer,Integer>  factorial_lambda;  // The positions of the lambda declaration and initialization must be as is.

public static void main(String[] args) {  new recursion();}

public recursion() {
 factorial_lambda=(i)->{
        if(i==1)
            return 1;
        else
            return i*(factorial_lambda.apply(i-1));
    };
    System.out.println(factorial_lambda.apply(5));
 }
}

// Output 120
share|improve this answer

I usually use (once-for-all-functional-interfaces defined) generic helper class which wraps the variable of the functional interface type. This approach solves the problem with the local variable initialization and allows the code to look more clearly.

In case of this question the code will look as follows:

// Recursive.java
// @param <I> - Functional Interface Type
public class Recursive<I> {
    public I func;
}

// Test.java
public double factorial(int n) {

    Recursive<IntToDoubleFunction> recursive = new Recursive<>();
    recursive.func = x -> (x == 0) ? 1 : x * recursive.func.applyAsDouble(x - 1);

    return recursive.func.applyAsDouble(n);
}
share|improve this answer

I heard at the JAX this year, that "lambads do not support recursion". What is meant with this statement is that the "this" inside the lambda always refer to the surrounding class.

But I managed to define - at least how I understand the term "recursion" - a recursive lambda and it goes like that:

interface FacInterface {
  int fac(int i);
}
public class Recursion {
  static FacInterface f;
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    int j = (args.length == 1) ? new Integer(args[0]) : 10;
    f = (i) -> { if ( i == 1) return 1;
      else return i*f.fac( i-1 ); };
    System.out.println( j+ "! = " + f.fac(j));
  }
}

Save this inside a file "Recursion.java" and with the two commands "javac Recursion.java" and "java Recursion" it worked for me.

The clou is to keep the interface that the lambda has to implement as a field variable in the surrounding class. The lambda can refer to that field and the field will not be implicitly final.

share|improve this answer

You can also define it as a local variable by creating a final array of size one (of say Function[]) and then assign the function to element 0. Let me know if you need the exact syntax

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.