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What I wanted to do, is find out all the entry in my file when the first element in each line, with "hh:mm:ss" format, is between two hours

File format:

14:40:00 user1 load xxxx xxxx xxxxx
14:40:02 user2 change xxx xxx xxxxx
15:03:04 user1 change xxx xxx xxxxx
so on...

I would like to get al the entry between 14:40:00 and 15:00:00.

I was thinkig to do it with the following command, but I dont know how can follow with the fiter.

cat app.log | grep change | awk '{print $1 if .....}' 

After that I would like to print whole line. Could somebody tell me how can I do conditional filter in command line?

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
awk '"14:40:00" <= $1 && $1 <= "15:00:00"' app.log

If you want to pass in the start and end times dynamically:

start=14:40:00 
end=15:00:00
awk -v start=$start -v end=$end 'start <= $1 && $1 <= end' app.log

If, as you show, you also only want "change" events:

awk -v start=$start -v end=$end 'start <= $1 && $1 <= end && /change/' app.log
awk -v start=$start -v end=$end 'start <= $1 && $1 <= end && $3 == "change"' app.log
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Good! Didn't know awk allows string comparison like this. –  fedorqui Oct 17 '13 at 15:23
    
Wow!! Brillian!!...thanks!! –  Sallyerik Oct 17 '13 at 15:31

This can be a way:

$ awk -F: '($1==14 && $2>=40) || ($1==15 && $2==0)' file
14:40:00 user1 load xxxx xxxx xxxxx
14:40:02 user2 change xxx xxx xxxxx

I also see you are grepping change. You can do it all together:

$ awk -F"[: ]" '/change/ && (($1==14 && $2>=40) || ($1==15 && $2==0))' app.log
14:40:02 user2 change xxx xxx xxxxx

Explanation

  • -F"[: ]" sets space or : as field delimiters. Is not entirely necessary as you could just use -F:, but it allows you to "play" with the rest of the fields if you want to.
  • '($1==14 && $2>=40) || ($1==15 && $2==0)' are the possible conditions to match: hour 14 + minute >=40 or hour 15 + minute == 0.
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Great!! it's exactly what I was lookig for!! Thanks a lot. –  Sallyerik Oct 17 '13 at 15:25

With perl it would be:

perl -n -e '/(\d\d:\d\d:\d\d) \S+ (\S+) / && $2 eq "change" && $1 ge "14:40:00" && $1 le "15:00:00" && print $_' < app.log

Or slightly more readable:

perl -n -e '/(\d\d:\d\d:\d\d) \S+ (\S+) / ' \
    -e '&& $2 eq "change" ' \
    -e '&& $1 ge "14:40:00" ' \
    -e '&& $1 le "15:00:00" ' \
    -e '&& print $_' < app.log
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unfortunately I have to do it in bash, anyway thanks!! –  Sallyerik Oct 17 '13 at 15:26

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