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As a novice in Javascript, I'm confused on which could be the best way to differentiate between the result computed by an asynchronous function, and any exception/error. If I'm right, you cannot use try-catch in this scenario, as the called function ends before the callback, and it is this latter who actually may throw an exception.

Well.

I've seen so far some library functions expecting a callback like: function(err, result). So, one have to test err before using result.

Also I tried myself to return either the actual result or an Error object. Here, the callback is of the form function(result) and you have to test result instanceof Error before using it. It follows an example of this:

function myAsyncFunction ( callBack ) {

 async_library_function( "some data", function (err, result) {
         if (err) {  callBack ( new Error ("my function failed") ); return; }

         callBack ( some calculation with result );        
 });

} // myFunction ()

//
// calling myFunction
//
myAsyncFunction (    function (result) {
    if (result instanceof Error ) { log ("some error occurred"); return; }

   log ("Alright, this is the result: " + result);
});

What is the best (maybe the common) way to do this?

Thanks.

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1  
Note that while on the browser there is no standard for this, in node.js the standard is to pass the exception as the first argument of the callback - callback(error) or callback(error,result). A lot of people that has gotten used to node.js has started to backport this pattern to the browser. It's not so much a "language" feature, just the culture of node.js –  slebetman Jul 4 '14 at 1:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are three main approaches that I've been using myself:

  1. Having an "error" parameter passed to the callback.
  2. Having an "error" callback. This is usually combined with (1).
  3. Having some sort of global exception manager.

I'll start with the third one. The idea is to have an object that will allow dispatching errors as well as catching them globally. Something like this:

var ErrorManager = {
  subscribers: [],

  subscribe: function (callback) { 
    this.subscribers.push(callback); 
  },

  dispatchError: function (error) {
    this.subscribers.forEach(function (s) {
      s.apply(window, [ error ]);
    });
  }
}

This is quite specific to a given situation because there's basically no easy way of tracking the origin of an error as well as it's easy to mess up with this. For example, if you need to hide a dialog box whose contents failed to load, you'd have to propagate this information (e.g. dialog box Id/element) to all the subscribers.

The above approach is good when you want to execute an action that doesn't alter (or alters an independent part) of the web application (e.g. displays a status bar or a message to a console).

The second approach basically makes a separation between successful call and a failure. For example:

$.ajax('/articles', {
  success: function () { /* All is good - populating article list */ },
  error: function () { /* An error occured */ }
});

In the above example, the success callback is never executed in case of a failure so if you want to have some default behavior to always trigger, you'd need to either sync between the two callbacks or have a callback that is always called (for the above example - complete).

I personally prefer the first approach - having a callback where you have an error object passed along with potential result. This eliminates problems with having to "track" the origin/context on an error as well as worrying about the clean-up procedure (default behavior). So, something like you provided:

function beginFetchArticles(onComplete) {
  $.ajax('/articles', {
    complete: function (xhr) {
      onComplete(xhr.status != 200 ? xhr.status.toString() : null, 
        $.parseJSON(xhr.responseText)); /* Something a bit more secure, probably */
    }
  });
}

Hope this helps.

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It depends vastly on your implementation. Is this a recoverable error? If it isn't, then the way you are suggesting should work just fine. If it is recoverable then you shouldn't be returning an error. You should be returning an "empty" result. Keep in mind maintainability as well. Do you want instanceof checks throughout the code? Also, I know some programmers like that JavaScript is loose with types, but you run into consistency issues when the expected object passed through can actually be unexpected. Is it a result, or an error, or even something else altogether?

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That's one way to do it. Though I'd usually leave any manipulations/processing of the result to the callback function.

Another way is you can pass back both the error and result values to the callback:

callback (err, result); \\ if no error, err = null, if no result, result = null

Alternatively, you can ask for separate error and success callbacks:

function myAsyncFunction ( successCallBack, errorCallBack ) {
    \* ... *\
 }

And then trigger the appropriate function depending on the received response.

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One approach can be like this:

function Exception(errorMessage)
{
    this.ErrorMessage = errorMessage;

    this.GetMessage = function()
    {
        return this.ErrorMessage;
    }
}

function ResultModel(value, exception)
{
    exception = typeof exception == "undefined"? null, exception;

    this.Value = value;
    this.Exception = exception;

    this.GetResult = function()
    {
        if(exception === null)
        {
            return this.Value;
        }
        else
        {
             throw this.Exception;
        }
    }
};

And in your usage:

function myAsyncFunction ( callBack ) {

    var result;

    async_library_function( "some data", function (err, result) {

         if (err) 
         {  
             result = new ResultModel(null, new Exception("my function failed"));
         }
         else
         {
             result = new ResultModel(some calculation with result);
         }

         callBack ( result );        
 });

} 

myAsyncFunction (    function (result) {

    try
    {
        log ("Alright, this is the result: " + result.GetResult());
    }
    catch(ex)
    {
        log ("some error occurred" + ex.GetMessage()); 
        return;
    }
});
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If you want to make robust programs, you should use promises. Otherwise you have to handle 2 different kinds of errors which is pretty crazy.

Consider how to read a file as JSON without crashing the server:

var fs = require("fs");

fs.readFile("myfile.json", function(err, contents) {
    if( err ) {
        console.error("Cannot read file");
    }
    else {
        try {
            var result = JSON.parse(contents);
            console.log(result); //Or continue callback hell here
        }
        catch(e) {
            console.error("Invalid json");
        }
    }

});

With promises e.g:

var Promise = require("bluebird");
var readFile = Promise.promisify(require("fs").readFile);

readFile("myfile.json").then(JSON.parse).then(function(result){
    console.log(result);
}).catch(SyntaxError, function(e){
    console.error("Invalid json");
}).catch(function(e){
    console.error("Cannot read file");
});

Notice also how the code grows vertically like with synchronous code instead of horizontally.

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