Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im experiencing strange behavior with Firefox and Dojo. I have a html page with these lines in the <head> section:

...
<script type="text/javascript" src="dojo.js" djconfig="parseOnLoad: true, locale: 'de'"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    dojo.require("dojo.number");
</script>
...

Sometimes the page loads normally. But sometimes it won't. Firefox will fetch the whole html page but not render it. I see only a gray window.

After some experiments I figured out that the rendering problem has something to do with the load time of the html. Firefox starts evaluating the html page while loading it. If the page takes too long to load the above javascript will be executed BEFORE the html finishes loading.

If this happens I'll get the gray window. Advising Firefox to show me the source code of the page will display the correct complete html code. BUT: if I save the page to disk (File->Save Page As...) the html code will be truncated and the above part will look like this:

...
<script type="text/javascript" src="dojo.js" djconfig="parseOnLoad: true, locale: 'de'"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    dojo.require("dojo.number");
</script></head><body></body></html>

This explains why I get to see a gray area. But why does this code appear there? I assume the require() method of Dojo does something "evil". But I can't figure out what. There is no write.document("</head><body></body></html>"); in the Dojo code. I checked for it.

The problem would be fixed, if I'd place the dojo.require("dojo.number"); statement in the window.load event:

<script type="text/javascript">
    window.load=function() {
       dojo.require("dojo.number");
    }
</script>

But I'm curious why this happens. Is there a Javasctript function which forces Firefox to stop evaluating the page? Does Dojo do somethig "bad"? Can anyone explain this behavior to me?

EDIT: Dojo 1.3.1, no JS errors or warnings.

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried installing Firebug and seeing how the page is actually loading? Also what version of dojo are you using? –  Kitson Dec 21 '09 at 22:38
    
In addition to looking at how the page is loading in the Firebug net panel, have you tried checking if there are any JS errors? –  Annie Dec 21 '09 at 22:43
    
Firebug allowed me to figure out that the timing will trigger it. But there is no further useful information. –  Eduard Wirch Dec 21 '09 at 22:43
    
Is there any change in behaviour when you enable the debug on dojo (e.g. djConfig="parseOnLoad:true, isDebug:true")? –  Kitson Dec 21 '09 at 22:46
    
isDebug:true doesn't change anything. –  Eduard Wirch Dec 22 '09 at 8:25

2 Answers 2

What does the rest of the page look like? What elements should be rendering that aren't? What other Javascript do you have?

What you have looks fine, but you will not be able to use methods in dojo.number or anything else loaded via dojo.require until after the page loads -- you must wait for window.onload to fire, or use the dojo.addOnLoad() method to trigger a callback. The latter is actually a bit quicker than onload.

dojo.require uses synch xhr to load which does block the browser, so if the load is unusually slow, you will notice a delay in the rendering of the page.

share|improve this answer
    
As I wrote, the page does not render at all. Using methods in dojo.number is not the problem. And there is no delay in rendering. Firefox just doesn't. –  Eduard Wirch Dec 22 '09 at 9:50
1  
yes, but it might help to know what else is on the page, or what the simplest possible sequence is to produce this behavior. More than this snippet is required to reproduce the problem, and some interaction must be in play. –  peller Dec 22 '09 at 18:06

I think this is a rendering bug in Firefox that I've seen in a number of contexts where the one common factor is the amount of time the browser takes to load all the resources loaded in the of the page. The more scripts you have in the head that take a long time to request over the network or eval, the higher your chances are of running into this. Hitting the page with a warm cache notably reduces the possibility of running into the paint bug as well. Another way to mitigate it is to put the javascript at the end of the which is also a best practice since it doesn't block the browser from previewing markup immediately as it gets it.

Regarding the specifics of using dojo, common use cases include running things onload like creating and starting up widgets. If you have code in an onload handler that uses a dojo module like a widget, then stick the dojo.require statement inside the onload handler as well instead of before the onload handler. There's no point in suffering the performance penalty or blocking the initial UI rendering if you don't need it until later. Then build custom dojo layers to include the minimal core (possibly a custom base to make it even smaller) and the other 90% of what you need in a separate layer. Load the minimal core layer in the head (to get dojo.addOnLoad, etc) and then the other layer at the end of the body. If you live in a modular application framework where apps come and go in the page content area depending on the page you're on, each app should put the dojo.require statements for the respective dojo module it uses immediately before the module is actually referenced.

This won't work obviously if you need a module immediately in an inline script, but if that's the case then a custom dojo build will also help mitigate that case also.

I'm unaware of a reported issue with Mozilla, but I have also seen this much less often on other browsers some time ago.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.