Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use OOP in Javascript with inheritance and prototyping. Would you please have a look at my JSfiddel http://jsfiddle.net/Charissima/daaUK/. The last value is the problem, thank you. I cannot understand why the function drive with raceCar doesn't get the totalDistance, which a set per putTotalDistance.

        function Car () {
            var that = this;

            this.totalDistance = 0;

            this.putTotalDistance = function(distance) {
                that.totalDistance = distance;
            };

            this.getTotalDistance = function() {
                return this.totalDistance;      
            };  

            this.drive = function(distance) {
                that.totalDistance += distance;     
                return that.totalDistance;
            };

            this.privateFunc = function() { 
                return 'car ' + this.totalDistance;
            };
        };


        function RaceCar (initialDistance) {
            var that = this;

            this.prototype = new Car();
            this.drive = function(distance) {
                return that.prototype.drive(2*distance);
            };

            this.privateFunc = function() {
                return 'raceCar ' + that.getTotalDistance();
            };
        };


        RaceCar.prototype = new Car();

        car = new Car;
        raceCar = new RaceCar;          


        car.putTotalDistance(200);
        alert('car totalDistance = ' + car.drive(10) + ' - ok');

        raceCar.putTotalDistance(200);
        alert('raceCar totalDistance before drive = ' + raceCar.getTotalDistance() + ' - ok');
        alert('raceCar totalDistance after drive = ' + raceCar.drive(10) + ' Why not 220?');                
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this:

function Car () {    
    this.totalDistance = 0;
};

Car.prototype.putTotalDistance = function(distance) {
    this.totalDistance = distance;
};

Car.prototype.getTotalDistance = function() {
    return this.totalDistance;      
};  

Car.prototype.drive = function(distance) {
    this.totalDistance += distance;     
    return this.totalDistance;
};


function RaceCar () {};
RaceCar.prototype = new Car();
RaceCar.prototype.parent = Car.prototype;
RaceCar.prototype.drive = function(distance) {
    return this.parent.drive.call(this, (distance * 2));
};

raceCar = new RaceCar();
raceCar.putTotalDistance(200);

document.body.innerHTML = 'raceCar totalDistance after drive = ' + raceCar.drive(10);

EDIT:

As pointed out in one of the other answers, the main problem is setting the prototype inside the constructor. Instead, set it separately. In the code above, I linked the car prototype to a racecar prototype parent property and then fire the parent's drive function using call so that the context of the function is set to the racecar (via this) and then passing the argument along.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why? A try this answer is very unsatisfying if it doesn't have an explanation to go with it. –  Bart Oct 18 '13 at 7:50
    
Fair enough. I will add something. –  Todd Oct 18 '13 at 13:38

Firstly var that = this; is unnecessary. In a object context this will always refer to the instance.

You also don't want to set the objects prototype inside it's own constructor.

If you want to access the prototype of a class don't try to access it through the instance.

The update fiddle

function RaceCar (initialDistance) {
    //var that = this;
    //this.prototype = new Car();

    this.drive = function(distance) {
        return RaceCar.prototype.drive(2*distance);
    };          
};

// This correctly sets the prototype
RaceCar.prototype = new Car();
share|improve this answer

Thank you, this works fine, but unfortunately another function I need is broken now. I created a new JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/Charissima/5g6GV/

car.putTotalDistance(0);            
raceCar.putTotalDistance(100);
var drivingFunctions = [car.drive, raceCar.drive];

myText += drivingFunctions[0](10) + '<br>';
try {
    myText += drivingFunctions[1](100) + '<br>';                
}
catch(err) {
    myText += err + '<br>'
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 you don't answer your question here. –  Stephane Rolland Oct 18 '13 at 7:23
    
The first question is answered, that's why I answered, sorry, if this was wrong. –  Karin Suel Oct 18 '13 at 7:32
    
Then just make a new question, don't hesitate to make a link on this question since it is related. To have a link to your question, click on "share" below tags and beside edit/close/flag. Answers must be answers, that's the way Stackoverflow works. –  Stephane Rolland Oct 18 '13 at 7:49
    
    
good. But in your new question, you have to indicate stackoverflow what the problem is the best possible you can. The more you are precise, the more they will help you. –  Stephane Rolland Oct 18 '13 at 7:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.