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I'm unable to use Ruby's Time.new syntax properly in JRuby, even though this works in other Ruby versions as described in the docs. The behavior is different in every way and in some ways, I believe, is incorrect. I have done some research online and it doesn't seem like this is well-known.

Before I go through the hassle of fixing this or submitting to the JRuby group, I want to make sure I'm not being dumb. So to compare, I'll use a basic example of very different behavior.

In JRuby:

jruby-1.6.8 :007 > JRUBY_VERSION
 => "1.6.8"
jruby-1.6.8 :008 > RUBY_VERSION
 => "1.9.2"
jruby-1.6.8 :009 > Time.new(2012, 10, 11, 0, 0, 0, '+09:00')
 => 2012-10-11 00:00:00 -0400
jruby-1.6.8 :010 > Time.new(2012, 10, 11, 0, 0, 0, '+9:00')
 => 2012-10-11 00:00:00 -0400

In Ruby:

1.9.2p320 :002 > RUBY_VERSION
 => "1.9.2"
1.9.2p320 :003 > Time.new(2012, 10, 11, 0, 0, 0, '+09:00')
 => 2012-10-11 00:00:00 +0900
1.9.2p320 :004 > Time.new(2012, 10, 11, 0, 0, 0, '+9:00')
 ArgumentError: "+HH:MM" or "-HH:MM" expected for utc_offset

What am I doing wrong?

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1 Answer 1

ruby has a lot of undocumented behavior. because of that there are a some differences between all the runtimes.

one project that tries to document all the special parts is RubySpec.

you could go here and see if your example is well documented: https://github.com/rubyspec/rubyspec/blob/master/core/time/new_spec.rb

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Actually, I think that project is meant to document a specification that all rubies should follow. I found the spec and ran this statement: Time.new(2000, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, "+05:30").utc_offset # => -18000 and the spec says should == 19800 so it would fail in this case. Good find! –  WattsInABox Oct 17 '13 at 17:46
1  
@WattsInABox it actually started because of all the "odd" parts –  phoet Oct 17 '13 at 17:50

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