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What is the best way to deserialize JSON strings with different formats to instances of the same Java class using Jackson?

For example, I have information about users fetched from different sources:

Format 1:

"user" : {
  "name"     : "John",
  "age"      : 21,
  "email"    : "john@mail.com",
  "location" : "NYC"
}

Format 2:

{
  "user" : "John",
  "mail" : "john@mail.com",
  "age"  : "21"
}

Format 3:

{
  "who"      : "John",
  "contacts" : "john@mail.com",
  "age"      : 21
}

And I want to deserialize all these strings into instances of following class:

public class User {
  public String name;
  public String email;
  public int age;
}

Maybe there is a way to define mapping from JSON fields to Java fields via Map rather then annotations?

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3 Answers 3

For the first part, whether or not "user" : should be a part of the JSON string, you can manipulate that using normal String manipulation in Java.

For the second part, about mapping mail to email and such, you can use setters

public class User {
  public String name;
  public String email;
  public int age;

  public void setMail(String value) {
     this.email = value;
  }
}

The setMail-method here will be detected by Jackson and will be called for the mail property in example 2. You can add such set-methods for all the mappings you would like (contacts, user, who).

share|improve this answer
    
Approach you've suggested looks good, but I'm afraid of billions setters that I'll have to add if more different formats will be presented. :) –  Filipp Oct 18 '13 at 19:03
    
@Filipp How many variations of "mail", "name" and "age" could you possibly come up with? –  Simon André Forsberg Oct 18 '13 at 19:09
    
At the moment I have about 5 or 6 combinations. –  Filipp Oct 18 '13 at 19:19

Directly deserializing your source data to the single target format can quickly become a bit cumbersome and error prone. I'd suggest to define separate classes for the different source formats, implementing an interface specifying a getUser() method. This method will produce you desired target format.

This way you have all code specific to the different providers in a single class, and it's easy to add new providers when needed.

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You've described my current implementation. I agree that it's quote easy to add new provider, but it requires a bit more work comparing to specification of fields name mapping. –  Filipp Oct 18 '13 at 19:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've dig Jackson documentation and found two solutions.

Here is my Java class:

public class User {
    protected String name;
    protected String email;
    protected int age;

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public void setEmail(String email) {
        this.email = email;
    }

    public void setAge(int age) {
        this.age = age;
    }

    public String toString() {
        return name + ": [ " + email + ", " + age + " ]";
    }
}

First solution is to create custom PropertyNamingStrategy:

public class MappingPropertyNamingStrategy extends PropertyNamingStrategy {

    Map<String, String> nameMap = new HashMap<String, String>();

    public void setMap(Map<String, String> map) {
        nameMap = map;
    }

    @Override
    public String nameForGetterMethod(MapperConfig<?> cfg,
                                      AnnotatedMethod method,
                                      String defaultName) {
        return mapName(defaultName);
    }
    @Override
    public String nameForSetterMethod(MapperConfig<?> cfg,
                                      AnnotatedMethod method,
                                      String defaultName) {
        return mapName(defaultName);
    }
    @Override
    public String nameForField(MapperConfig<?> cfg,
                               AnnotatedField field,
                               String defaultName) {
        return mapName(defaultName);
    }

    protected String mapName(String name) {
        if (nameMap.containsKey(name)) {
            return nameMap.get(name);
        } else {
            return name;
        }
    }
}

You can then define mapping from User fields to appropriate JSON fields:

    String json1 = "{ \"user\": { \"name\": \"John\", \"age\": 21, \"email\": \"john@mail.com\", \"location\": \"NYC\" }}";
    String json2 = "{ \"user\": \"John\", \"mail\": \"john@mail.com\", \"age\": \"21\" }";
    String json3 = "{ \"who\": \"John\", \"contacts\": \"john@mail.com\", \"age\": 21 }";

    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    MappingPropertyNamingStrategy namingStrategy = new MappingPropertyNamingStrategy();
    mapper.configure(DeserializationFeature.FAIL_ON_UNKNOWN_PROPERTIES, false);

    Map<String, User> res = mapper.readValue(json1, new TypeReference<Map<String, User>>() {});
    System.out.println(res.get("user"));


    mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    mapper.setPropertyNamingStrategy(namingStrategy);
    namingStrategy.setMap(new HashMap<String, String>() {{
                put("name", "user");
                put("email", "mail");
            }});
    System.out.println(mapper.readValue(json2, new TypeReference<User>(){}));


    mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    mapper.setPropertyNamingStrategy(namingStrategy);
    namingStrategy.setMap(new HashMap<String, String>() {{
                put("name", "who");
                put("email", "contacts");
            }});

    System.out.println(mapper.readValue(json3, new TypeReference<User>(){}));

Another solution is to use mixins:

@JsonIgnoreProperties({"location"})
abstract class FirstFormat {
}

abstract class SecondFormat {
    @JsonProperty("user")
    public abstract void setName(String name);
    @JsonProperty("mail")
    public abstract void setEmail(String email);
    public abstract void setAge(int age);
}

abstract class ThirdFormat {
    @JsonProperty("who")
    public abstract void setName(String name);
    @JsonProperty("contacts")
    public abstract void setEmail(String email);
    public abstract void setAge(int age);
}

And then you need only associate it with User class:

    mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    mapper.addMixInAnnotations(User.class, FirstFormat.class);
    Map<String, User> res = mapper.readValue(json1, new TypeReference<Map<String, User>>() {});
    System.out.println(res.get("user"));        

    mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    mapper.addMixInAnnotations(User.class, SecondFormat.class);
    System.out.println(mapper.readValue(json2, new TypeReference<User>(){}));

    mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    mapper.addMixInAnnotations(User.class, ThirdFormat.class);
    System.out.println(mapper.readValue(json3, new TypeReference<User>(){}));

I think, mixins is the best solution, because it provide more control.

share|improve this answer
    
What you are calling "mixins" are actually called "annotations". Anyways, well digged! I dig it. –  Simon André Forsberg Oct 18 '13 at 19:21

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