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I have a string of text (about 5-6 words mostly) that I need to convert.

Currently the text looks like:

THIS IS MY TEXT RIGHT NOW

I want to convert it to:

This Is My Text Right Now

I can loop through my collection of strings, but not sure how to go about performing this text modification.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 135 down vote accepted
string s = "THIS IS MY TEXT RIGHT NOW";

s = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(s.toLower());
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1  
wow, I wouldn't ahve guessed that one! –  mrblah Dec 21 '09 at 23:29
11  
Haha, really? That's where it is? I love .NET but some of the API designers are real jerks. –  George Mauer Dec 21 '09 at 23:37
4  
Note that while this method will do what the questioner has asked, it's a naive algorithm that just capitalizes each word, without regard to what kind of word it is. It's not really "title case" since rules for title casing differ in different languages. It's not even correct for English. For instance, the title "about a boy" should be "About a Boy" in English, but this method would give "About A Boy". If you want true title case, you'll have to write your own method. –  Kyralessa Dec 21 '09 at 23:43
11  
I wouldn't call them jerks. The thing with "ToTitleCase" is that it's culture-dependent, hence it has to be in the System.Globalization namespace. Going through CurrentThread is just done to get the current Culture of the Thread (Be aware that this may cause different behavior if the user has a different Locale!). You could as well do "CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase()", which may be better as InvariantCulture behaves the same on all cultures. Out of interest George: Where would you put a Culture-Specific String function? –  Michael Stum Dec 21 '09 at 23:45
1  
Also note the comments about ALL UPPERCASE strings: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Michael Stum Dec 21 '09 at 23:46

I probably prefer to invoke the ToTitleCase from CultureInfo (System.Globalization) than Thread.CurrentThread (System.Threading)

string s = "THIS IS MY TEXT RIGHT NOW";
s = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(s.ToLower());

but it should be the same as jspcal solution

EDIT

Actually those solutions are not the same: CurrentThread --calls--> CultureInfo!


System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture

string s = "THIS IS MY TEXT RIGHT NOW";
s = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(s.ToLower());

IL_0000:  ldstr       "THIS IS MY TEXT RIGHT NOW"
IL_0005:  stloc.0     // s
IL_0006:  call        System.Threading.Thread.get_CurrentThread
IL_000B:  callvirt    System.Threading.Thread.get_CurrentCulture
IL_0010:  callvirt    System.Globalization.CultureInfo.get_TextInfo
IL_0015:  ldloc.0     // s
IL_0016:  callvirt    System.String.ToLower
IL_001B:  callvirt    System.Globalization.TextInfo.ToTitleCase
IL_0020:  stloc.0     // s

System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture

string s = "THIS IS MY TEXT RIGHT NOW";
s = System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(s.ToLower());

IL_0000:  ldstr       "THIS IS MY TEXT RIGHT NOW"
IL_0005:  stloc.0     // s
IL_0006:  call        System.Globalization.CultureInfo.get_CurrentCulture
IL_000B:  callvirt    System.Globalization.CultureInfo.get_TextInfo
IL_0010:  ldloc.0     // s
IL_0011:  callvirt    System.String.ToLower
IL_0016:  callvirt    System.Globalization.TextInfo.ToTitleCase
IL_001B:  stloc.0     // s

References:

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There's a couple of ways to go about converting the first char of a string to upper case.

The first way is to create a method that simply caps the first char and appends the rest of the string using a substring:

public string UppercaseFirst(string s)
    {
        return char.ToUpper(s[0]) + s.Substring(1);
    }

The second way (which is slightly faster) is to split the string into a char array and then re-build the string:

public string UppercaseFirst(string s)
    {
        char[] a = s.ToCharArray();
        a[0] = char.ToUpper(a[0]);
        return new string(a);
    }
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Untested but something like this should work:

var phrase = "THIS IS MY TEXT RIGHT NOW";
var rx = new System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(@"(?<=\w)\w");
var newString = rx.Replace(phrase,new MatchEvaluator(m=>m.Value.ToLowerInvariant()));

Essentially it says "preform a regex match on all occurrences of an alphanumeric character that follows another alphanumeric character and then replace it with a lowercase version of itself"

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This is exactly what I've been looking for, thank you! –  Eric Brown Jun 3 '13 at 7:08

When building big tables speed is a concern so Jamie Dixon's second function is best, but it doesn't completely work as is...

It fails to take all of the letters to lowercase, and it only capitalizes the first letter of the string, not the first letter of each word in the string... the below option fixes both issues:

    public string UppercaseFirstEach(string s)
    {
        char[] a = s.ToLower().ToCharArray();

        for (int i = 0; i < a.Count(); i++ )
        {
            a[i] = i == 0 || a[i-1] == ' ' ? char.ToUpper(a[i]) : a[i];

        }

        return new string(a);
    }

Although at this point, whether this is still the fastest option is debatable, the Regex solution provided by George Mauer might be faster...

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1  
it works, but i changed this "a.Count()" to a.Length –  Christian Jan 8 '14 at 1:14

If you're using on a web page, you can also use CSS:

style="text-transform:capitalize;"

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Why CSS? When the question is asking for c# asp.net regex –  Jay Feb 25 at 10:41

I don't know if the solution below is more or less efficient than jspcal's answer, but I'm pretty sure it requires less object creation than Jamie's and George's.

string s = "THIS IS MY TEXT RIGHT NOW";
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(s.Length);
bool capitalize = true;
foreach (char c in s) {
    sb.Append(capitalize ? Char.ToUpper(c) : Char.ToLower(c));
    capitalize = !Char.IsLetter(c);
}
return sb.ToString();
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1  
If we're concerned with object creation, why not do it in-place with a for loop indexing over s instead of using a StringBuilder? –  jball Dec 21 '09 at 23:37
1  
Strings are immutable. –  ephemient Dec 22 '09 at 1:29

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