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When an instance variable is inherited, changing it in the subclass does not affect its value in the superclass and vise versa. That implies that there are two instance variables. But when I do sizeof( sublcass ), only one instance variable is accounted for in the size. So is there a second object that gets created for the superclass ?

Here's a small snippet to illustrate what I'm saying:

struct Super {

  int x;

  void func() {

    cout << "SUPERCLASS" << endl;
    cout << x << endl;            /* prints garbage value */
    x = 4;                        
    cout << x << endl;            /* prints 4 */

  }

};

struct Sub : public Super {


  void func() {

    x = 10;
    Super b;
    b.func();
    cout << "SUB" << endl;
    cout << x << endl;       /* prints 10 */

  }

};



int main() {

  Sub b;
  b.func();

  return 0;

}

The output:

SIZE: 4
SUPERCLASS
2867344
4
SUB
10
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You inherit a class not a single instance of a class or an instance variable. –  Kunal Oct 17 '13 at 17:34
    
What does make you to think that you modify the same object? That they both called b in main() and func() ? –  Slava Oct 17 '13 at 17:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In this function, you create a new object of type Super and print it.

void func() {

    x = 10;

    // b is now a totally different (and unrelated object)
    // so calling b.func() will print the x variable that
    // is valid for that instance (not this instance)
    Super b;
    b.func();

    cout << "SUB" << endl;
    cout << x << endl;       /* prints 10 */

  }

Your assumption is actually incorrect, there is only one instance variable x that lives within your class Sub. Your function Sub::func() has hidden Super::func() and in order to call it, you need to directly call it using the scope resolution operator (::).

void func() {

    // this is the one (and only) x that is in scope
    // inherited by `Sub` from `Super`.
    x = 10;

    // call Super::func(), using the scope resolution operator
    Super::func();

    cout << "SUB" << endl;
    cout << x << endl;       /* prints 10 */

  }
share|improve this answer
    
Omg I'm an idiot. I knew I was overlooking something. Thanks. I'll accept the answer as soon as it lets me. –  Kacy Raye Oct 17 '13 at 17:41

If you just make usage of data members explicit you should see where the issue is:

   void func() {

    this->x = 10;
    Super b;
    b.func();
    cout << "SUB" << endl;
    cout << this->x << endl;       /* prints 10 */

  }

As this is obviously not equal to &b you should clearly see that you are accessing members of different objects.

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