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I have a loop where I define a closure for an event:

for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    obj.onload = function(e) {
        me.myFunction(e, i);
    };
}

I need to pass that counter variable to the function that is called when the load event is triggered. I always get the same value being passed.

How can I pass the right counter value to the function?

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did you try passing i to the function callback? –  Akshay Khandelwal Oct 17 '13 at 17:43
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1 Answer

The usual way to solve this is with a builder function, so that the handler closes over something that doesn't change:

function buildHandler(index) {
    return function(e) {
        me.myFunction(e, index);
    };
}
for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    obj.onload = buildHandler(i);
}

You can do that with an immediately-invoked function expression (IIFE), but in theory it creates and throws away a function on every loop (I expect most JavaScript engines these days optimize that) and I, at least, think it's a lot harder to read:

for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    obj.onload = (function(index) {
        return function(e) {
            me.myFunction(e, index);
        };
    })(i);
}

There's an ES5 feature, Function#bind, that you can use if you want to use me.myFunction directly, but you'd have to change the order in which you were expecting the arguments (index first, then the event):

for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    obj.onload = me.myFunction.bind(me, i);
}

bind creates a function that, when called, calls the original function with this set to the first argument (so, me above), then any further arguments you give it, and then any arguments that were used when calling the function. (That's why the order myFunction was expecting them had to change to index, e rather than e, i.)

On older browsers, you need a shim for Function#bind.

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You are my GOD. –  drgomesp Oct 17 '13 at 17:48
    
@DanielRibeiro: LOL! –  T.J. Crowder Oct 17 '13 at 17:49
    
Just so I can know, if I would to use Ext.Function.bind() from the ExtJS library, how would that code look like? docs.sencha.com/extjs/4.2.1/#!/api/Ext.Function-method-bind –  drgomesp Oct 17 '13 at 17:56
    
@DanielRibeiro: Wow, those docs are unclear, but I think it would be obj.onload = Ext.Function.bind(me.myFunction, me, [i], true); and myFunction should expect to get the event object first, then the index. But, um, you'd have to double-check that. –  T.J. Crowder Oct 17 '13 at 18:02
1  
Not a problem at all. The first solution solves the issue and is actually pretty. Thanks! –  drgomesp Oct 17 '13 at 18:13
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