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I have a lot of canvases (about 200) that need to be pre-rendered. While the browser is rendering them, other parts of the page do not repaint during changes (e.g. a progress bar) so there's a lot of jerky updates/animation to the page. I tried calling the canvas drawing via window.requestAnimationFrame but this did not improve it.

How do I force it to repaint much more often?

example of how animation frame was used

//This is done  200 times (once for each canvas)
function draw()
{
    //Draw the image to canvas
    context.drawImage( ... );
}

requestAnimationFrame( draw );
share|improve this question

rAF can only request a new frame (synced with monitor) - there is no guarantee in getting one.

If your code uses more than the available time budget (approx. 16.7ms for 60 Hz systems), which is likely if you update 200 canvases, you won't get a frame until a next is available.

If your code uses a lot of time this can be many frames in the future and the animation will appear "jerky".

In these cases it is probably better to reduce frame rate by using setInterval and use f.ex. 1000/15 for the delay and just live with that it won't update on monitor sync from time to time.

Updating 200 canvases is to say the update area is also 200 times larger than the normal size of the canvas. In addition the browser will have to maintain repaints for 200 elements rather than just one. You can only do so much in JavaScript..

share|improve this answer
    
I tried putting each of the calls into setTimeout's (which is equivalent to setInterval with changes to which canvas you're working on) and it did not improve. The canvases are pretty big as are the images being drawn on them and I think there may be no way to speed this up. – Don Rhummy Oct 17 '13 at 19:40
    
@DonRhummy I agree with you. It'a a huge load on the browser and it may be worse on someone else's computer if theirs is less spec'ed hardware-wise (it would result in a very low FPS). Perhaps a buffer approach could help out (not knowing exactly what you try to do of course) - only having canvases that are visible on the screen and then dynamically maintain them depending on scroll etc. Or if possible use a single canvas and buffer draw only the visible content to it. – K3N Oct 17 '13 at 19:48

http://www.paulirish.com/2011/requestanimationframe-for-smart-animating/

The browser can optimize concurrent animations together into a single reflow and repaint cycle, leading to higher fidelity animation. For example, JS-based animations synchronized with CSS transitions or SVG SMIL. Plus, if you’re running the animation loop in a tab that’s not visible, the browser won’t keep it running, which means less CPU, GPU, and memory usage, leading to much longer battery life.

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I would make it like this:

//This is done  200 times (once for each canvas)
function draw()
{
    //Draw the image to canvas
    context.drawImage( ... );
}

function loop()
{
    draw();
    requestAnimationFrame( loop );
}

loop();

This way you create endless loop, which is limited by browser to max 60 frames per second. If browser or computer is slow, framerate will be less. In my experience, it does improve performance.

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