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After being unsuccessful in using decorators to define the stochastic object of the "logarithm of an exponential random variable", I decided to manually write the code for this new distribution using pymc.stochastic_from_dist. The model that I am trying to implement is available here(the first model): enter image description here

Now when I try to sample the log(alpha) using MCMC Metropolis and with a Normal distribution as proposal(as it has been stated in the following picture as the sampling method), I am getting the following error:

  File "/Library/Python/2.7/site-packages/pymc/distributions.py", line 980, in rdirichlet
    return (gammas[0]/gammas[0].sum())[:-1]

FloatingPointError: invalid value encountered in divide

Although the times that the sampling doesn't run into error the sampling histograms are matching with the ones in this paper. My hierarchical model is:

"""
A Hierarchical Bayesian Model for Bags of Marbles

logalpha ~ logarithm of an exponential distribution with parameter lambd
beta ~ Dirichlet([black and white ball proportions]:vector of 1's)
theta ~ Dirichlet(alpha*beta(vector))

"""

import numpy as np
import pymc
from scipy.stats import expon
lambd=1.
__all__=['alpha','beta','theta','logalpha']
#------------------------------------------------------------
# Set up pyMC model: logExponential
# 1 parameter: (alpha)

def logExp_like(x,explambda):
    """log-likelihood for logExponential"""
    return -lambd*np.exp(x)+x
def rlogexp(explambda, size=None):
    """random variable from logExponential"""
    sample=np.random.exponential(explambda,size)
    logSample=np.log(sample)
    return logSample
logExponential=pymc.stochastic_from_dist('logExponential',logp=logExp_like,
                                          random=rlogexp,
                                          dtype=np.float,
                                          mv=False)
#------------------------------------------------------------
#Defining model parameteres alpha and beta.
beta=pymc.Dirichlet('beta',theta=[1,1])
logalpha=logExponential('logalpha',lambd)

@pymc.deterministic(plot=False)
def multipar(a=logalpha,b=beta):
    out=np.empty(2)
    out[0]=(np.exp(a)*b)
    out[1]=(np.exp(a)*(1-b))
    return out
theta=pymc.Dirichlet('theta',theta=multipar)

And my test sampling code is:

from pymc import Metropolis
from pymc import MCMC
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
import HBM
import numpy as np
import pymc
import scipy
M=MCMC(HBM)
M.use_step_method(Metropolis,HBM.logalpha, proposal_sd=1.,proposal_distribution='Normal')
M.sample(iter=1000,burn=200)

When I check the values of theta passed to gamma distribution in line 978 of distributions.py I see that there are not zero but small values! So I don't know how to prevent this floating point error?

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1  
I think there should be an exception catcher in the main code of distributions.py for PyMC to handle the cases where gammas[0] is zero! –  Cupitor Oct 17 '13 at 18:51
    
what will be result if you'll add np.seterr(divide='ignore') just after imports in your test sampling code? –  alko Oct 24 '13 at 13:06
    
@alko, thanks but still the same error. –  Cupitor Oct 28 '13 at 21:21

3 Answers 3

If you do get small numbers, it might simply be too small for a float. This is typically also what the logarithms are there for to avoid. What if you use dtype=np.float64?

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The point is that would need playing with the source code of PyMC! Which I prefer not! But thanks. –  Cupitor Oct 28 '13 at 21:22

You might also want to look at the Decimal.

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You have to set left value and right value in your program.. Maybe this will help you to solve your error.

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