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I'm trying to wrap a JavaScript object literal in a self executing anonymous function. The first code example below works fine, but the second doesn't and I'm not really sure why?

Works:

(function(){
    return MyApp = {
        init: function() {
            console.log('MyApp init');
        }
    }
})();

Doesn't Work:

(function(){
    var MyApp = {
        init: function() {
            console.log('MyApp init');
        }
    }
    return MyApp;
})();

As I understand things, the SEAF should execute and immediately return. That's why the first example returns MyApp as an object I can interact with. I thought assigning MyApp to a variable inside the SEAF and then returning it would do the same thing but in:

Uncaught ReferenceError: MyApp is not defined 

Why?

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1  
In your first example you are assigning the result to the global variable named 'MyApp'. In the second case you are assigning the variable to a closure local variable named 'MyApp'. You have to assign the result of the closure execution somewhere, otherwise it gets lost. –  Mike Edwards Oct 17 '13 at 21:11
1  
Your code works just fine assuming you catch the return values. –  zzzzBov Oct 17 '13 at 21:11
    
As zzzzBov points out, it works just fine if you put var someName = (theClosureExecution) –  Mike Edwards Oct 17 '13 at 21:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since the result of your SEAF (better named IEFE) is not used anywhere, it doesn't really matter what the function returns. Now compare

(function(){
    MyApp = {…}
})();

with

(function(){
    var MyApp = {…}
})();

The difference is that in the second function your variable is preceded by a var keyword which makes it local to the IEFE, while in the first function it is an implicit global (which you should avoid). That way, the second snippet doesn't assign to anything in the global scope, and accessing MyApp later from outside will fail with the error.

Better return some value that you then assign to a globally declared variable:

var MyApp = (function(){
    return {…};
})();
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if I'm using this to namespace my JavaScript code, is returning an object literal the best way to implement a Singleton pattern since I only really want one instance of the App available at any given time? –  Iain Oct 19 '13 at 13:01
    
Yes, probably. If you don't have any local variables in the module, you can omit the IEFE; and it doesn't necessarily need to be an object literal but you could use any way to create object. –  Bergi Oct 19 '13 at 20:27

What your first example is doing is setting MyApp as a global variable - since the variable MyApp is not preceded by a var keyword or dot notation, it becomes global. It sounds like that's not actually an issue for you if you're putting MyApp in a self-executing function - you can really just remove the return statement from it - or even define other globals in the same function. You don't ever reference the result of your top-level function, so there's no use of that return.

Your second example sets MyApp as a local variable using var, so it's visible only inside of the context of the function that's running it.

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