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I am aware that a class cannot be defined within a class in php, however I'm curious if there's another way to achieve the desired effect.

I currently have a set of 3 objects used to conduct a search. The first is called $search_request. It contains properties like $keywords (string), $search_results_per_page (int), $page_requested (int), $owner_id (int)

I also have an object called $search_result, it contains properties like $total_matches (int), $result_set (array of objects)

Finally I have the $search_handler object which contains the $search_request and $search_result, along with functions that build the $search_result based on the $search_request. Usage goes like so:

$search_handler = new search_handler();
$search_handler->search_request->keywords = "cats, dogs";
$search_handler->search_request->search_results_per_page = 10;
$search_handler->search_request->page_search_requested = 1;
$search_handler->get_search_result();

echo $search_handler->search_result->total_matches;
foreach($search_handler->search_result->result_set)
{
    //do something
}

All of this works fine. The problem is I want to repeat this model for different objects, so currently I'm forced to use the hackey solution of the "search_" prefix on each class.

I'd like to have something like:

class search 
{
    public class request
    {
        $keywords = "";
        $search_results_per_page = 5;
        $page_requested = 1;        
    }
    public class result
    {
        $total_matches = null;
        $result_set = array();
    }
    public get_results()
    {
        //check cache first
        $cached = look_in_cache(md5(serialize($this->request)));
        if($cached)
        {
            $this->result->result_set = $cached;    
            $count = count($cached);                
            $this->result->total_matches = $count;                  
        }
        else
        {
            //look in db
            $results = get_results_from_database($this->request->keywords); //db call goes here
            $this->result->result_set = $results;
            $count = count($results);
            $this->result->total_matches = $count;                      
        }
    }       
}

//usage
$search = new search();
$search->request->keywords = "cats, dogs";
$search->request->search_results_per_page = 10;
$search->request->page_search_requested = 1;
$search->get_results();

echo $search->results->total_matches;
foreach($search->results->result_set as $result)
{
    //do something
}
share|improve this question
    
What about associative arrays for the result and the request? so $search->request = array( 'keywords'=> '', 'serach_results_per_page' => 2 ), etc... your request and result are really structs since they do not have any methods to perform on their properties. –  joe42 Oct 17 '13 at 21:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If for whatever reason you don't want to have those classes you need in different files you can do the following

<?php
    class search 
    {
        var $request;
        var $result;

        public function __construct()
        {
            $this->request = new StdClass();
            $this->request->keywords = "";
            $this->request->search_results_per_page = 5;
            $this->request->page_requested = 1;    

            $this->result = new StdClass();
            $this->result->total_matches = null;
            $this->result->result_set = array();
        }       
        // ...
    }

$search = new search();
var_dump($search->request, $search->result);
?>
share|improve this answer
    
I'm voting for this one because it most directly addresses my question. However, Machavity's answer is very useful too. –  Jesse Adam Oct 18 '13 at 17:29

There's several things to suggest here

First, if you're using PHP 5.3 or later, consider using namespaces and autoloading. That would allow you to make classes like \Cat\Search and \Dog\Search.

Second, I would avoid setting object properties directly. I would highly suggest you make your variables protected and use getters and setters instead. Limit your object interaction to methods and you can control the process much more easily.

$search_handler = new search_handler();
$search_handler->setKeywords(array("cats", "dogs"));
share|improve this answer
    
Why is it important to avoid setting object properties directly? If this is a subjective opinion - noted, if there is a security or performance difference please explain. –  Jesse Adam Oct 18 '13 at 13:55
    
It's not as much subjective as it is a best practice. When you make all your variables public then anything can edit them. If they are protected you can control what interacts with them (and thus you have better control over what happens inside your class). Setters and getters are the best way to interact with them. –  Machavity Oct 18 '13 at 16:51
    
Firstly, I'd like to say I appreciate all your advice so far, and I am definitely considering the use of namespaces. I am curious about your last comment, when you say "anything can edit them", what specifically do you mean? Another programmer working on the project? A hacker? –  Jesse Adam Oct 18 '13 at 17:27
    
Another programmer. Let's say you have a class that calculates what size of tire a car needs. It has internal methods and variables. What if I could edit the variables, though? So I could have the script try to look up a Kia 325i. But no such car exists! And what if you get asked to find out why it failed? What a mess. If I only let you set data based on methods I have defined, I could always ensure I have good data to work with because I could write a method called setModel which would throw an exception telling you you're passing me bad data. Less headaches for everyone. –  Machavity Oct 18 '13 at 18:21

You could define your request and result classes as separately, and then have variables in your main class be assigned to instances of those.

Something like:

class result{
...
}

class request{
...
}

class search{
    var results;
    var request;

    function __construct(){
        $results = new ArrayObject();
        $request = new stdClass();
    }
...
}

Then you can assign/append to the list of results in your search function and you can just assign a request object to your 'request' variable

$this->results[] = $newresult;

and loop through them when displaying

share|improve this answer

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