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I want to get the current time on the device in the format: 2013-10-17 15:45:01 ?

The server sends me the date of an object in the format above as a string. Now i want to get the phones current time and then check if there is a difference of say more than 5 minutes?

So A: How can i get the devices current time in this fomat: 2013-10-17 15:45:01

B how can I work out the difference between the two.

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You might want to have a look at SampleDateFormat –  Ye Lin Aung Oct 17 '13 at 21:38
    
You do not want to do A, since comparing string date times will be a nightmare. You want to convert the server string into a date time and then compare with the current phone time.stackoverflow.com/questions/3941357/… –  Simon Oct 17 '13 at 21:40

4 Answers 4

You can use SimpleDateFormat to specify the pattern you want:

new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss").format(new java.util.Date())

However, if you just want to know whether the time difference is within a certain threshold, you should probably just compare long values. If your threshold is 5 minutes, then this is 5 * 60 * 1000 milliseconds so you can use the same SimpleDateFormat by calling it's parse method and check the long values.

Example:

new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss").parse("2013-10-13 14:54:03").getTime()
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You should specify a locale, e.g. Locale.US, as a second parameter in the new SimpleDateFormat(...) constructor. –  Marco W. Sep 23 '14 at 8:26

Date currentDate = new Date(); will initialize a new date with the current time. In addition, convert the server provided time and take the difference.

String objectCreatedDateString = "2013-10-17 15:45:01";  
SimpleDateFormat  format = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss"); 
Date objectCreatedDate = null;
Date currentDate = new Date();
try 
{objectCreatedDate = format.parse(objectCreatedDateString);} 
catch (ParseException e) 
{Log.e(TAG, e.getMessage());}
int timeDifferential;
if (objectCreatedDate != null)
    timeDifferential = objectCreatedDate.getMinutes() - currentDate.getMinutes();
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2  
You don't really have to supply System.currentTimeMillis() to java.util.Date constructor - it's automatically initialized with curent time. But you must specify new operator. –  mvmn Oct 17 '13 at 21:59

Use SimpleDateFromat Class

DateFormat dateFormatter = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss");
dateFormatter.format(date);

Also check this documentation

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If you can ask the server to send you an RFC3339 compliant date/time string, then Here is a simple answer to both of your questions:

public String getClientTime() {
    Time clientTime = new  Time().setToNow();
    return clientTime.format("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S");
}

public int diffClientAndServerTime(String svrTimeStr) {
    Time svrTime = new Time();
    svrTime.parse3339(svrTimeStr);

    Time clientTime = new  Time();
    clientTime.setToNow();
    return svrTime.compare( svrTime, clientTime);
}
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