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I want to create a 0 to 1 value that I will get from my timer. The value will describe how long it is until the next tick. 0 is the furthest away from the tick (in milliseconds) 0.5 is halfway to the tick and 1 is when it ticks.

How can I achieve this?

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How long is a tick? It's not really clear what you're asking for, to be honest... –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '13 at 22:14
    
The ticks vary between 1000 to 3000 miliseconds.. I want to know that if Im 1500 miliseconds away from a tick on a timer that have a interval of 3000, my decimal value will be 0.5 . –  user2864398 Oct 17 '13 at 22:22
    
And what's the structure of your timer? Is it based on Stopwatch, or the system time? It's really hard to help you without more information... –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '13 at 22:24
    
Im sorry! I mean the regular "Timer" from the standard .net toolbox in visual studio express 2012. –  user2864398 Oct 17 '13 at 22:27
    
Do you mean System.Windows.Forms.Timer then? There are at least three different Timer classes in .NET... –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '13 at 22:29

2 Answers 2

One simple option would be to use a Stopwatch. Start it when you start the timer, and call Restart at the start of each tick handler - indeed, you can do this separately by adding a handler just to do the stopwatch restart before you add the "real" handler.

Then you'd use:

double progress = stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds / timer.Interval;

Bear in mind that could be more than 1 occasionally, as the timer may fire late depending on what else the UI thread is doing. Note that this provides a double rather than a decimal, but I think that's more appropriate for this situation.

How you encapsulate this really depends on how what you're trying to do and how the rest of your program hangs together... we don't have enough information to guide you there at the moment.

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Perfect, thanks! –  user2864398 Oct 17 '13 at 22:41

Something like this would work, but given the amount of jitter involved in when the timer callback(s) occur, you'll get at best an approximation:

class MyResourceIntensiveTimer : IDisposable
{
  private Stopwatch Stopwatch     ;
  private Timer     Timer         ;
  private long      PrevTick      ;
  private long      PeriodInTicks ;

  public Decimal TicksToNextTock
  {
    get
    {
      long elapsedTicks = Stopwatch.ElapsedTicks - PrevTick ;
      decimal value = ((decimal)elapsedTicks) / ((decimal)this.PeriodInTicks) ;
      return value ;
    }
  }

  public MyResourceIntensiveTimer( TimeSpan period )
  {
    if ( period <= TimeSpan.Zero ) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("period") ;
    this.PeriodInTicks = period.Ticks ;
    this.Timer    = new Timer( TimerCallback , null , period , period ) ;
    this.PrevTick = (this.Stopwatch=Stopwatch.StartNew()).ElapsedTicks ;
    return ;
  }

  private void TimerCallback( object o )
  {
    this.PrevTick = Stopwatch.ElapsedTicks ;
    this.OnTock.Invoke() ;
    return ;
  }

  public event Action OnTock ;

  public void Dispose()
  {

    if ( this.Stopwatch != null )
    {
      if ( this.Stopwatch.IsRunning )
      {
        this.Stopwatch.Stop() ;
      }
      this.Stopwatch = null ;
    }

    if ( this.Timer != null )
    {
      this.Timer.Change(Timeout.Infinite , Timeout.Infinite ) ; // shut things down
      this.Timer = null ;
    }

  }

}
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