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I'm trying to make a code that returns the kth smallest element in a vector. For example: Lets say you have a vector rand which contains elements {0, 3, 2, 5} And the user inputs 2 as a value for K. The function should then return element 2 from the vector since it is the 2nd (kth) smallest element in the vector.

so far this is my code:

int iterative_kth_element(vector<int>& vec, size_t k)
{
    int index = 0;
    int min = vec[0];


    for(int i = k;i<vec.size();i--) {
            for (int j = 1; j < vec.size();j++) {
            if ( min > vec[j] ) {
                min = vec[j];
                index = i;
            }
        vec.erase(vec.begin() + index);

        if (i == 1) {
            return min;
        }

            }
    }

}

it keeps returning some huge number that is not even in the vector.

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10  
Unless you really need to do otherwise (e.g., this is homework) use std::nth_element. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 17 '13 at 23:45
    
Actually sorting the vector and returning the kth element from the front might be a faster approach to this unless you really want to solve it iteratively –  Smac89 Oct 17 '13 at 23:51
    
Yea I have to do it with an unsorted vector –  Manny O Oct 17 '13 at 23:58
    
You can't get by with just storing 1 value for min. You need to store the k smallest items and maintain this array/list of information as you do 1 iteration over the vector. After one iteration, return the largest of your k items. –  JustinDanielson Oct 18 '13 at 0:11

5 Answers 5

for(int i = k;i<vec.size();i--)

doesn't seem right, assuming that k is always < vec.size(), then condition i<vec.size() is completely useless here. Instead you might rather add:

for(int i = k; i > 0; i--)

And nested loop should actually check all elements, therefore it should start at 0 (it skips first element):

for (int j = 0; j < vec.size(); j++) {
             ^

And I believe that

index = i;

was meant to be:

index = j;

And make sure all possible paths of execution return some value, pay attention to warnings the compiler gives you. Put one more return statement at the end of function:

return min;

BUT your main problems are:

  • you should update min before the nested loop starts the execution
  • the scope of nested loop shouldn't contain the erase call

Try:

int foo(std::vector<int>& vec, const size_t k)
{
    int index = 0;
    int min = -1;

    for(size_t i = 0; i < k; ++i) {
        if (vec.empty()) return min;
        min = vec[0];
        for (size_t j = 0; j < vec.size(); ++j) {
            if (vec[j] < min) {
                min = vec[j];
                index = j;
            }
        }
        vec.erase(vec.begin() + index);
    }
    return min;
}

int main() {
    int a[] = {0, 3, 2, 5};
    std::vector<int> v(a, a+4);
    std::cout << foo(v, 2);
}
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I was using i < vec.size() because im assuming that the kth element is withing the vector range. I might be doing something wrong because its returning 0 instead of the kth smallest when I do this method. –  Manny O Oct 17 '13 at 23:57
    
It's an iterative solution. He doesn't need to start at 0 because he can start under the assumption that the first k items are the smallest. He's just forgot to create a list of the first k items. He'll need that to compare and store the k smallest items found. –  JustinDanielson Oct 18 '13 at 0:09
    
@MannyO: See my edit (under line). –  LihO Oct 18 '13 at 0:09

Start here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selection_algorithm

int iterative_kth_element(vector<int>& vec, size_t k)
{
     int minIndex, minValue;
     for (int i = 0; i < k; i++)
     {
         minIndex = i;
         minValue = vec[i];
         for (int j = i+1; j < n; j++)
         {
             if (vec[j] < minValue)
             {
                 minIndex = j;
                 minValue = vec[j];
             }
         }
         int tmp = vec[i];
         vec[i] = vec[minIndex];
         vec[minIndex] = tmp;
     }
     return vec[k];
}
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1/ you have a vector but you almost use it only as an array

2/ consider using an iterator.

3/ you are receiving the vector as a reference, which means modifications on it such as erasing an element is effective out of the scope of the method, do you really want to do that?

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Here is some incomplete code for my solution. It only takes 1 pass over the vector. This will run in linear time with respect to vec. Hopefully it clears things up. My previous text is kind of wordy. I left it below this source though.

int iterative_kth_element(vector<int>& vec, size_t k)
{
    int mins[k];
    //assume first k elements are min
    for(int i=0; i<k; i++)
    {
        mins[i] = vec[i];
    }

    //TODO:
    //sort mins array here
    //bubble sort is okay if k is small, or pivot

    for(int i=k; i < vec.size(); i++)
    {
        //since mins is sorted, mins[k-1] is the highest value
        if(vec[i] < mins[k-1])
        {
            mins[k-1] = vec[i];
        }

        //TODO:
        //sort mins array here
        //you could do a slick bubble sort starting from 
        //the back of mins until you find the location 
        //for the new min item
    }

    return mins[k-1];
}

//previous text

If you're finding a the kth smallest item. You should initialize an array with the first k item. Or store the indexes into vec where the smallest items are found.(would start with 0,1,2,3,...,k)

int index = 0;
int min = vec[0];

should be

int* mins = new int[k];
for(int i=0; i < k; i++) {
    mins[i] = vec[i];
}

I would also recommend keeping this array of k smallest integers sorted. If you know where the largest item is, you only have to check each element in vec against the largest item in mins. You'll need a sort method though, which will be called everytime you find something smaller than one of your mins.

After one iteration of vec, you should have the k smallest items in that array. Just return the largest item. Stored at location 0 or k-1 in your array.

Something else to note: If k is greater than vec.size() / 2, you should look for the (vec.size() - k) largest item.

This should be log(k*n) time with a maximum memory footprint of 1.5n(the case where k is exactly vec.size()/2 is the worst case).

where n is the size of vec and k is the parm in the function.(k's upper limit is n/2 if you implement that note).

Worst case scenario is getting a list of numbers in descending order with k being half the size of n.

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You are missing something in that code plus this is c++ not c –  Smac89 Oct 18 '13 at 0:02
    
Good call, forgot to cast malloc to int*. I just changed it to new int[k]. –  JustinDanielson Oct 18 '13 at 0:06
    
So with this method I won't need the second loop? OR will I have to adjust it? –  Manny O Oct 18 '13 at 0:18
    
All of the previous solutions are suggesting that you sort the vector and then return the k item. Another solution is to use a selection sort k times, always removing the smallest item from that list. My solution will only involve 1 pass over the array. Although you may have to do multiple passes over the min[] to keep it sorted. –  JustinDanielson Oct 19 '13 at 5:03
    
@JustinDanielson: My answer fixes his very same approach and it doesn't sort the vector. –  LihO Oct 19 '13 at 10:17

The array of integer numbers is set.

  1. To delete from the array all positive elements, which allocated between maximal and minimal elements.

  2. To calculate the sum of negative cells of array.

  3. To calculate the minimum of prime elements

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