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I apologize in advance if I've formulated this question poorly; I'm fairly new to web coding.

My goal is to use JavaScript to scan a webpage and determine whether or not a particular string is present. The difficulty here is that the page is dynamically rendered, so the string in question will never appear in the source code.

Would the string appear in the DOM if it is rendered on the page? If I were to scan the DOM would I find it there, and are there any special considerations to take into account if so?

Essentially I am looking for a simple way to scan the text that has been rendered on a page, not the source code. This must be possible somehow because my browser's "find on page" function works on the dynamically rendered page in question. Would there be a way to access the rendered elements on the page through the browser API itself? (I'm using Chrome.)

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Yes, that is possible through the DOM. –  Qantas 94 Heavy Oct 18 '13 at 0:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

var stringToSearchFor = 'foobar';
var searchThisString = document.body.innerText || document.body.textContent;
var found = (searchThisString.indexOf(stringToSearchFor) >= 0);

This extracts the text from the page, ignoring all markup, then does a simple scan of the resulting string.

In some versions of FireFox this will include the contents of inline script tags.

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Thanks for your reply. Will this work even if the string isn't in the source? I understand that this method will strip the markup from the source, but even then my string still wouldn't be in the remaining text. –  Pacific 231 Oct 18 '13 at 0:31
    
Yes, this should grab the current text from the DOM, including any modifications since the page was loaded. –  Mike Edwards Oct 18 '13 at 1:01
    
Ahhh I see. So this function will strip the markup from the HTML that results from the page code. Makes sense. Thank you very much! –  Pacific 231 Oct 18 '13 at 5:05
    
Don't forget to vote up the answer and/or mark it as the accepted answer with the checkmark. –  Mike Edwards Oct 18 '13 at 5:21
    
Done and done. Thanks :) –  Pacific 231 Oct 18 '13 at 5:52

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