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I've got a pickle of a problem that I can't seem to wrap my head around. I need to find the product of columns two and three in a text file (rate of pay * hours worked). I can tell my program to do it for a given line (shown below) but can't figure out how to do it for every line.

Filename = "database.txt"


rawtext = open(Filename, "r")
text = rawtext.read()
line = text.split('\n')
column0 = line[0].split('\t')
column1 = line[1].split('\t')
column2 = line[2].split('\t')

print("Last Name \t Hours \t Wages" )
print(column0[0],"\t",column0[2],"\t","$",int(column0[1])*int(column0[2]))
print(column1[0],"\t",column1[2],"\t","$",int(column1[1])*int(column1[2]))
print(column2[0],"\t",column2[2],"\t","$",int(column2[1])*int(column2[2]))

I'm pretty sure some kind of for loop or while statement is what I'm looking for but I just can't figure it out.

The file is formatted as

Name \t Hours \t Rate

If it matters.

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for i in xrange(len(line)): should get you started... –  mattedgod Oct 18 '13 at 1:13
3  
The canonical way is to use the csv module, which takes care of such things for you. –  hd1 Oct 18 '13 at 1:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should use the csv-module.

import csv

with open("database.txt", "r", newline="") as csvfile:
    csvreader = csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter='\t')
    print("Last Name \t Hours \t Wages")
    for row in csvreader:
        print('{}\t{}$\t{}'.format(row[0], row[2], float(row[1])*float(row[2])))

Edit: Changed from casting to int, to casting to float.

You should also validate the input. Depending on what you want to do if the input aren't as expected, you could try something like this:

import csv

with open("database.txt", "r", newline="") as csvfile:
    csvreader = csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter='\t')
    print("Last Name \t Hours \t Wages")
    for row in csvreader:
        try:
            print('{}\t{}\t{}'.format(row[0], row[2], float(row[1])*float(row[2])))
        except ValueError:
            # Handle cases where the casting of row[1] and row[2] to float fails
            code
        except IndexError:
            # Handle cases where index is out of bounds
            code
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1  
One minor tweak: if the OP is using Python 3 as the print syntax suggests, then with open("database.txt", "r", newline=""): is the right open (see here). –  DSM Oct 18 '13 at 1:40
    
@DSM Thanks, I've altered the answer accordingly. –  Steinar Lima Oct 18 '13 at 1:51
    
Wahoo! Exactly what I needed. Thank you! Just had to move the $ to after the \t, but that's pretty minor. –  Adrian R Oct 18 '13 at 14:12

Save column0, column1,column2 as a list or a tuple. Example:

lines=line[0].split('\t'),line[1].split('\t'),line[2].split('\t')
print("Last Name \t Hours \t Wages" )
for column in lines:
    print(column[0],"\t",column[2],"\t","$",int(column[1])*int(column[2]))
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