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Hi I have an error in my c++ code. I have 2 .cpp files and 1 .h file, Im trying to access 5 strings and 1 int from the header file but I get an error that says "explicit type is missing('int' assumed).

I have some other errors too which are: Missing type specifier, Shops::Items redefinition; different basic types, Overloaded function differs only by return type and declaration is incompatible.

Here are my files:

UserChoice.h

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

#ifndef USERCHOICE_H
#define USERCHOICE_H

class Shops
{
public:

    double Items(string, string, string, string, string, int);

    int main()
    {
        std::cout << newItem1;
    }

private:
    string newItem1;
    string newItem2;
    string newItem3;
    string newItem4;
    string newItem5;
    int newItems;

};
#endif

Items.cpp

#include "UserChoice.h"

Shops::Items(string Item1, string Item2, string Item3, string Item4, string Item5, int     Items)
{
    newItem1 = Item1;
    newItem2 = Item2;
    newItem3 = Item3;
    newItem4 = Item4;
    newItem5 = Item5;
    newItems = Items;
}

Source.cpp

#include "UserChoice.h";
#include <string>

int main()
{
    string Item1;
    string Item2;
    string Item3;
    string Item4;
    string Item5;
    int items;

    std::cout << "What what you like? Chicken, Meat, Fish, Carrot or Apple?\n";
    std::cin >> Item1;
    std::cout << "\nAnything else?\n";
    std::cin >> Item2;
    if(Item2 == "nothing else")
    {

    }
    std::cout << "\nAnything else?\n";
    std::cin >> Item3;
    std::cout << "\nAnything else?\n";
    std::cin >> Item4;
    std::cout << "\nAnything else?\n";
    std::cin >> Item5;
    std::cout << "\nAnything else?\n";
}

Error line

Shops::Items(string Item1, string Item2, string Item3, string Item4, string Item5, int Items)

All the code isn't finished yet so I hope you can help me find and fix these errors. Thanks in advance and if you need anymore info just ask me.

share|improve this question
    
I believe Daniel's answered your question. A suggestion: instead of having 5 strings in your class and your function signature, why don't you use vector<string>? –  Raja Oct 18 '13 at 6:08
    
Raja makes a good point. Passing in vector<string> will allow you to have as many items are you like without affected the method signature and you will be able to determine how many items you have by using vector size() removing the need to pass in an items count. –  Montdidier Oct 18 '13 at 6:12

2 Answers 2

You are missing the return type in the implementation file (cpp) for Shops::Items which would be a double on the basis of what you have your in header file. The other errors you have are very likely related.

It is a little disconcerting having a method named main within your class as it's normally a function name used for your program entry point.

share|improve this answer

You are missing the return type in the definition in Items.cpp:

double Shops::Items(string Item1, string Item2, string Item3, string Item4, string Item5, int Items)
{
    //...
}

You also need to return some value, both for Shops::Items and for the class' main function.

Regarding the naming: It looks weird to have the "normal" main function replicated inside the class and it also looks weird to have a parameter named exactly like the class is named. It does in fact work, but I would flag it in a code review FWIW. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Also, you should not name the last parameter Items, as this will certainly clash with your class method Items(...) if you try to use the variable. –  Michael Schlottke Oct 18 '13 at 6:06
    
Thanks! This fixed it. –  Matthew C Oct 18 '13 at 6:08
    
@MichaelSchlottke It looks weird, but it is actually allowed and will not necessarily clash, i.e. any potential clash can be resolved by using struct Items or ::Items. –  Daniel Frey Oct 18 '13 at 6:13
    
@DanielFrey Thanks for pointing this out. Maybe I should have said "this will certainly make the code less readable" :) –  Michael Schlottke Oct 18 '13 at 6:39

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