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I was trying to print a vector<int> using a helper function as follows:

This doesn't works -

template<class T>
void print(const std::vector<T>& v)
{
    std::vector<T>::const_iterator i;
    for (i = v.begin(); i != v.end(); i++)
        std::cout << *i << "  ";
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

Edit: I get this.

Error

But this works -

template<class T>
void print(const std::vector<T>& v)
{
    // changed std::vector<T> to std::vector<int>
    std::vector<int>::const_iterator i;
    for (i = v.begin(); i != v.end(); i++)
        std::cout << *i << "  ";
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

I wanted to ask following things :

  • Why does first doesn't work and second does?
  • What are alternative ways to write a function for same functionality? P.S. I don't want any of the element to be changed inside the function. I guess it can be done using for_each() algorithm. But I am not sure how I would write the predicate for it.
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marked as duplicate by Joachim Pileborg, juanchopanza, Angew, MSalters, Rapptz Oct 18 '13 at 10:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Maybe replace class T by typename T if you want to use int –  arne Oct 18 '13 at 7:52
6  
Oh, and please try to read the error messages. It actually says exactly what you have to do to fix it. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 18 '13 at 7:57
1  
@arne Honestly, I've been programming template-heavy code for some 4 years and that's the first time I hear this distinction. I've learned to favour class everywhere, because it cannot be confused with a typename signifying a non-type template parameter. –  Angew Oct 18 '13 at 9:21
2  
Congrats. You made a screenshot of text. –  rightfold Oct 18 '13 at 10:57
2  
I prefer to treat my coworkers like grownups and assume the reader knows what they are reading, i.e., knows that class and typename are interchangeable in that context. If they don't, they have no business reading that code and will go back to reading that book that teaches templates and forever be free of confusion. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 18 '13 at 11:19

3 Answers 3

You should use

typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator i;

to make it work (as the compiler is telling you in the error message).

const_iterator is a template-dependent name in the 1st case, so you have to use the keyword to disambiguate it.

Please follow the link in Joachim Pileborg's comment for a good explanation.

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std::vector<T>::const_iterator is a dependent name, you need to add typename in front:

typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator i;

Or just write this way:

for (auto it  = v.begin(); it != v.end(); ++it) {
    std::cout << *it << "  ";
}

Or

for (auto const& e : v) 
{
   cout << e << "\n";
}
std::cout << std::endl;

What is dependent name:

A name that depends in some way on a template parameter. Certainly any qualified or unqualified name that explicitly contains a template parameter is dependent. Furthermore, a qualified name that is qualified by a member access operator (. or ->) is dependent if the type of the expression on the left of the access operator depends on a template parameter. In particular, b in this->b is a dependent name when it appears in a template. Finally, the identifier ident in a call of the form ident(x, y, z) is a dependent name if and only if any of the argument expressions has a type that depends on a template parameter.

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Or std::copy(,,std::ostream_iterator(std::cout)) - plenty of ways to do this without needing to spell out the iterator type. –  MSalters Oct 18 '13 at 10:51
  • Why does first doesn't work and second does ?

Because you neglected the errors

typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator i;
^^^Use typename
  • What are alternative ways to write a function for same functionality? P.S. I don't want any of the element to be changed inside the function. I guess it can be done using for_each() algorithm. But I am not sure how I would write the predicate for it.
struct foo{
    void operator()(const int &i) const{
        std::cout<<i<<"  ";
    }
}
for_each(v.begin(), v.end(),foo());
share|improve this answer
    
So the second works because the typename is defined in second function as I explicitly wrote the type? –  Sumit Gera Oct 18 '13 at 8:02
    
@mozart yes,because in second you have vector of elements of type int, so its known –  P0W Oct 18 '13 at 8:06

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