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There is this table in my Oracle database that is used to store audit information.

When I first did a SELECT * on that table, the audit timestamps were all on the same day, within the same hour (e.g. 18/10/2013 15:06:45, 18/10/2013 15:07:29); the next time I did it, the previous entries were gone, and the table then only contained entries with the 16:mm:ss timestamp.

I think something is acting on that table, such that every interval the table contents is/may be backed up to somewhere - I don't know where, and then the table is cleared. However, as I'm not familiar with databases, I'm not sure what is doing this.

I'd like to know how I can find out what is acting on this table, so that I can in turn retrieve the previous data I need.

EDIT:

What I've tried thus far...

SELECT * FROM DBA_DEPENDENCIES WHERE REFERENCED_NAME='MY_AUDIT_TABLE';

I got back four results, but all of which were (based on my programming skills) talking about putting data into the table, none about backing it up anywhere.

SELECT * FROM MY_AUDIT_TABLE AS OF TIMESTAMP ...

This only gives me a snapshot at a certain time, but since the table is being updated very frequently, it does not make sense for me to query every second.

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Are you deliberately hiding any information about the table, throwing phrases like There is this table and including select* without the from clause? Is it a user defined table or a system audit table? How your audit process is configured? Are you using oracle Audit technologies or it's self-made? –  Nicholas Krasnov Oct 18 '13 at 9:05
    
Generic idea would be to check in recycle bin... Turn it on before start using the same. Check for any triggers or some other piece of code which acts on this table. If you want you can monitor the SQL sessions too –  realspirituals Oct 18 '13 at 9:10
    
@realspirituals OP talking about rows not objects. Only deleted objects appear in the Recycle bin not rows. –  Nicholas Krasnov Oct 18 '13 at 9:16
    
OOPS... oversight –  realspirituals Oct 18 '13 at 9:22
    
I wish I could give as much info as needed, but the thing is I'm really not that familiar with databases. What it looks like to me: it's a table, I do a select * from mytable to see what's inside. –  ohseekay Oct 18 '13 at 9:48

1 Answer 1

The dba_dependencies view will give you an idea on what procedures, function etc will act on the table

SELECT * FROM DBA_DEPENDENCIES WHERE REFERENCED_NAME='MY_AUDIT_TABLE';

where MY_AUDIT_TABLE is the audit table name

if the table's synonym is used in the database then

SELECT * FROM DBA_DEPENDENCIES WHERE REFERENCED_NAME='MY_AUDIT_TABLE_SYNONYM'; 

where MY_AUDIT_TABLE_SYNONYM is the synonym for MY_AUDIT_TABLE

Or if any triggers are acting on the table

  Select * from dba_triggers where table_name='MY_AUDIT_TABLE';

for external script to process the table

you can request DBA to turn on DB Fine grained audit for the table

Then query view DBA_FGA_AUDIT_TRAIL with timestamp between 15:00:00 and 16:00:00 to check the external call(OS_PROCESS column will give Operating System Process ID) or what SQL(SQL_TEXT) is executing on the table

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I tried the first statement, and yes I did come across some triggers. However, I'd also like to know if it's possible that something external could be acting on the table, say a script? –  ohseekay Oct 18 '13 at 9:56

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