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I m embarking on a difficult journey to create/replace a IDE for one of the middleware products from Bigblue.

Thy have created a IDE based on eclipse and Its a PIA to use it and very very slow even on decent configuration machine. Problem is there is no alternative to this.But i m planning to create one. So to start off i need to write a GUI in C++. I m planning to use Qt for this. But i need to understand how eclipse generate aritifacts and such. There are some graphical elements in Eclipse IDE used by bigblue. I need to create exacltly those graphical elements in my IDE.

So its basically writing a eclipse IDE only in C++ , but for the middle ware product only.

Any guidance , suggestions are most welcome.

I know i might fail in this endeavor, but I would rather try and fail than just to complain about how slow the IDE is.

Thanks all.

Edit : I have been using the Eclipse IDE for 5 years provided by bigblue and its dead slow, I have to use their version because it has customized environment for middleware tool. I m finally tired of it. :(

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If you do not know anything about implementing IDEs, this will take you several months to get anywhere near something usable. Are you prepared to put in that kind of time? –  JesperE Dec 22 '09 at 9:37
    
yes I m so tired and fed up using the crap from bigblue.. planning to make it open source..so others can help –  someguy Dec 22 '09 at 10:03
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Months? Eclipse has been in development for years. You're not going to get anything remotely close to the same functionality. Have you considered just getting a faster workstation? –  tgamblin Dec 22 '09 at 17:45
    
Your company is obviously screwed up (from your comment in an answer saying they can't afford a decent development machine for maybe $700). Check your employment agreements and make sure you can open-source something. –  David Thornley Dec 22 '09 at 17:51
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@David : You are wrong..every company that uses this tool has this problem..and i knw this because i have friends there.. Does this mean all companies that use this tool are screwed up.. –  someguy Dec 24 '09 at 8:24

5 Answers 5

Write a better Eclipse plugin? 

Eclipse by itself isn't slow, and Java is fairly fast, so I have to think you would win by simply doing a better Eclipse plugin.

If you don't believe me or if I'm wrong then I have to think the back-up plan is to write a plugin for a different IDE.

Even VS has third-party plug-ins.

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Any faster IDE than Eclipse.. I m sorry but I find eclipse very very slow.. and its not just me..all the people i kwn who work with this tool say it so..but we have no other option.. –  someguy Dec 22 '09 at 7:17
    
I tried to present both alternatives: (1) Eclipse is fast, the plugin is slow, or (2) both are slow. –  DigitalRoss Dec 22 '09 at 7:30
1  
+1 Try Eclipse in a clean configuration as downloaded from Eclipse.org. It works just fine. –  zvikico Dec 22 '09 at 8:00
    
Ok So when you say eclipse is fast , it doesn't require JRE correct? i mean is it java based? –  someguy Dec 22 '09 at 8:07
6  
It's a bit unnerving suggesting writing a replacement for Eclipse, while at the same time knowing nothing about it. –  skaffman Dec 22 '09 at 8:46

You can try to optimize your running environment.

  1. Buy more RAM! A development machine for Eclipse should have 4 GB RAM. Working with less is a waste of time.

  2. Optimize your Eclipse JVM parameters - lots of articles on that subject.

  3. I found that Eclipse works more smoothly on Mac OS X and Linux boxes than on Windows. My guess is that it is probably due to the superior memory management of Unix based OSs. Personally, I often find myself running 2-3 instances of Eclipse on OS X and they are all running just fine.

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Buy more RAM! A development machine for Eclipse should have 4 GB RAM. Working with less is a waste of time. (Company cannot afford ) Optimize your Eclipse JVM parameters - lots of articles on that subject.( tried this with all parameters , eclipse is still slow) I found that Eclipse works more smoothly on Mac OS X and Linux boxes than on Windows. My guess is that it is probably due to the superior memory management of Unix based OSs. Personally, I often find myself running 2-3 instances of Eclipse on OS X and they are all running just fine.(Forced to use windows system for work :( –  someguy Dec 22 '09 at 8:40
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If your company cannot afford $700 development machines, then it sure can't afford the literally thousands of hours it takes to write a "tolerable" IDE. –  Sam Harwell Dec 22 '09 at 8:48
    
I m writing it for me..not for the company.. –  someguy Dec 22 '09 at 8:53
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If the company can't afford to get you 4G of RAM for your development machine, it can't afford to pay you. Look for a new job. If it's run so badly that they're willing to pay you and not give you a $700 development machine, I'd have no confidence in their future. Look for a new job. –  David Thornley Dec 22 '09 at 17:50
    
I tend to agree, however, you probably haven't visited India :-) –  zvikico Dec 22 '09 at 20:39

Do not judge the entire Eclipse ecosystem by your experience with a single IDE based on it. The Eclipse platform is not slow in itself and modern JVMs are pretty efficient (although a little memory hungry). If the IDE you are forced to use is slow and badly designed, it is probably due to that particular IDE, and not because of Eclipse itself.

I have quite a few years of experience designing and implementing IDEs, and I can tell you that if you embark on writing your own IDE, you will need at least 3-4 people just to keep it up with the feature set found in Eclipse/Visual Studio/etc. If you write it only for your own use, you will find that you get very little time over to do real work.

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Eclipse is a wonderful "platform" for developing our own IDE. That way you don't need to worry too much about the mundane things and you can focus on what sets your IDE apart. A good place to start is the Eclipse Languages IDE

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Also -- take a look at xtext for editor development. –  Scott Stanchfield Dec 22 '09 at 18:39

The only practical way to approach the problem as described in the OP is to write your IDE features as an extension to an existing IDE framework. For a full-featured IDE, you'll probably be starting with one of the following:

  • Eclipse
    • Cross-platform
    • Extensions written in Java
  • Visual Studio
    • Windows-only
    • Extensions written in a .NET language and/or C++

If you write your own IDE from scratch, you'll spend all your time working on the core IDE and end up with a product not nearly as good as one based on an existing IDE. Use a profiler to guide your work and you'll find the extension plenty fast enough.

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interested in this # Visual Studio * Windows-only * Extensions written in a .NET language and/or C++ –  someguy Dec 22 '09 at 8:41

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