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I'm at the very first experiences with the decorators, and I created a decorator class that filters the result of a target function, that returns by default a certain sequence:

class Filter(object):
    def __init__(self, id=None):
        self.id = id

    def __call__(self, func):
        def wrapper(*args):
            entity_ids = func(*args)
            result = {}
            for k, v in entity_ids.items():
                if self.id:
                    if '_' + str(self.id) in k:
                        result.update({k: v})
            return result
        return wrapper

I use the decorator in some other classes methods like this:

class SomeClass(object):
    @Filter(id=None)
    def get_ids(*args):
        return result_sequence

How can I define the arguments for the decorator when calling the class method:

>>>sc = SomeClass()
>>>sc.get_ids(*args)  # I want to pass the id kwarg for Filter here 

Thanks in advance

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Martin's answer is exhaustive... or almost. If you want to be able to override the "id" argument when calling the decorated function you may do it using a keyword arg, ie:

class Filter(object):
    def __init__(self, id=None):
        self.id = id

    def __call__(self, func):
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            id = kwargs.get("id", self.id)
            entity_ids = func(*args)
            result = {}
            for k, v in entity_ids.items():
                if id:
                    if '_' + str(id) in k:
                        result.update({k: v})
            return result
        return wrapper

BUT note that this implies that 1. you WILL have to pass 'id' as a keyword argument if you want to overload the default 2. you WONT be able to pass kargs to the decorated function that way (but you don't pass kargs anyway)

As a side note (and slightly OT here but...), your wrapper function's implementation could be improved somewhat:

        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            id = kwargs.get("id", self.id)
            if not id:
               # no need to go further
               return {}

            id = "_%s" % id
            entity_ids = func(*args)
            result = dict(
                (k, v) for k, v in entity_ids.items()
                if id in k
                )
            return result
share|improve this answer

You applied the Filter decorator in the class definition; it is there that you pass in the id argument:

@Filter(id=None)

If id should be something else, you need to pass that value in there.

The Filter() object is created in the @Filter(id=None) line, then called. You could also rewrite the code to read:

class SomeClass(object):
    def get_ids(*args):
        return result_sequence
    get_ids = Filter(id=None)(get_ids)

as that is what Python does when it handles a decorator.

It is the return value of the Filter.__call__() method that replaces get_ids, you can no longer specify arguments to the Filter() object at that time. SomeClass.get_ids() is now the nested wrapper() function your decorator returned.

If you wanted to specify id when calling the decorated method, you'd need to alter the wrapper() signature to accept an (optional) extra id argument. Because you already support *args, your only option is to add a **kwargs catch-all argument to support optional keyword arguments:

def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
    id = kwargs.get('id', self.id)
    entity_ids = func(*args)
    result = {}
    for k, v in entity_ids.items():
        if id:
            if '_' + str(id) in k:
                result.update({k: v})
    return result

Here, instead of using self.id directly, a id keyword argument to the wrapper overrides the id value set on the decorator class:

sc.get_ids(*args, id='foo')

You may want to pass on any keyword arguments to the wrapped function as well; in that case, I'd use:

def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
    id = kwargs.pop('id', self.id)
    entity_ids = func(*args, **kwargs)
    result = {}
    for k, v in entity_ids.items():
        if id:
            if '_' + str(id) in k:
                result.update({k: v})
    return result

Here, the id keyword argument is removed before passing on the remaining keyword arguments to the wrapped function.

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You'd have to change your wrapper:

class Filter(object):
    def __init__(self, id=None):
        self.id = id

    def __call__(self, func):
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            id = kwargs.get('id', self.id)
            entity_ids = func(*args)
            result = {}
            for k, v in entity_ids.items():
                if self.id:
                    if '_' + str(self.id) in k:
                        result.update({k: v})
            return result
        return wrapper

This gives you the opportunity to give an alternative id value at the time of calling the wrapped method:

class SomeClass(object):
    @Filter(id=None)
    def get_ids(*args):
        return result_sequence

The Filter object's __call__ method now returns a wrapper which has an additional id kwarg. Thus, you can override the id value given at class definition time:

sc = SomeClass()
sc.get_ids(*args, id='other')  # I want to pass the id kwarg for Filter here 
share|improve this answer
1  
def wrapper(*args, id=None): raises SyntaxError: invalid syntax –  Francesco Della Vedova Oct 18 '13 at 12:40
    
@FrancescoDellaVedova Thx, corrected. –  glglgl Oct 18 '13 at 13:34

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