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We have some data in a text file which is built into our executable as a custom resource to be read at runtime. The size of this text file is over 7 million characters.

I can successfully search for and locate strings within the resource which appear near the top of the text file, but when attempting to search for terms a few million characters down, strstr returns NULL indicating that the string cannot be found. Is there a limit to the length of a string literal that can be stored in a char* or the amount of data that can be stored in an embedded resource? Code is shown below

char* data = NULL;
HINSTANCE hInst = NULL;
HRSRC hRes = FindResource(hInst, MAKEINTRESOURCE(IDR_TEXT_FILE1), "TESTRESOURCE");
if(NULL != hRes)
{
    HGLOBAL hData = LoadResource(hInst, hRes);
    if (hData)
    {
        DWORD dataSize = SizeofResource(hInst, hRes);
        data = (char*)LockResource(hData);
    }
    else
        break;

    char* pkcSearchResult = strstr(data, "NumListDetails");
    if ( pkcSearchResult != NULL )
    {
        // parse data
    }
}

Thanks.

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1  
I'm guessing this is in a loop, otherwise break won't do anything. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 18 '13 at 10:08

3 Answers 3

Do you get any output from GetLastError(), specifically after calling SizeofResource.

You can also check that dataSize > 0 to ensure an error hasn't occurred.

DWORD dataSize = SizeofResource(hInst, hRes);
if(dataSize > 0)
{
    data = (char*)LockResource(hData);
}
else 
{
    //check error codes
}

MSDN Docs

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dataSize is 7 million and something and 'data' contains a valid string that I can search through with strstr. I'll see what GetLastError returns and get back to you. –  Bill Walton Oct 18 '13 at 10:22
    
Aha. strlen(data) returns 3014. Well under the actual length returned by SizeOfResource. –  Bill Walton Oct 18 '13 at 10:38
1  
Just reading up further on this, have you tried this : msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms647486.aspx -- using LoadString rather than casting as char* ? I'm not familiar with this process so ignore if this is way off the mark. Cheers. –  Chris L Oct 18 '13 at 10:42
    
Is it possible that you have NULL characters in your string? –  Srđan Tot Oct 18 '13 at 10:54
    
It could be. The text file is an auto generated hash of various executable and configuration files. –  Bill Walton Oct 18 '13 at 10:58

The problem might be the method you use for searching. strstr uses ANSI strings, and will terminate when it encounters a '\0' in the search domain.

You might use something like memstr (one of many implementations can be found here).

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The problem was null characters in the data which prematurely ended the char* variable. To get around this I just had to read the data into a void pointer then copy it into a dynamically created array.

DWORD dataSize = SizeofResource(hInst, hRes);
void* pvData = LockResource(hData);
char* pcData = new char[dataSize];
memcpy_s(pcData,strlen(pcData),pvData,dataSize);
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