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I have four tables

  • Customers - PK: CustomerID
  • Events - PK: EventID
  • Customers_Events - Join table containing two FK's CustomerID and EventID
  • Customer_Checkins - contains a timestamp column (CheckinDateTime) and a FK reference to CustomerID

I want output like this

CustomerName   EventName    CheckinDateTime
------------   ----------   ---------------
Peter          Christmas    2012-12-25 00:27:48.350
Peter          Valentines   2013-02-14 01:19:36.113
Peter          Spring       2013-05-20 02:13:53.710

The problem is that I get this result instead

CustomerName   EventName    CheckinDateTime
------------   ----------   ---------------
Peter          Christmas    2012-12-25 00:27:48.350
Peter          Christmas    2013-02-14 01:19:36.113
Peter          Christmas    2013-05-20 02:13:53.710
Peter          Valentines   2012-12-25 00:27:48.350
Peter          Valentines   2013-02-14 01:19:36.113
Peter          Valentines   2013-05-20 02:13:53.710
Peter          Spring       2012-12-25 00:27:48.350
Peter          Spring       2013-02-14 01:19:36.113
Peter          Spring       2013-05-20 02:13:53.710

Each valid record is returned three times

This is the script I use to get the result above

SELECT DISTINCT 
    Customers.Firstname, Events.EventName, CustomerCheckins.CheckinDateTime
FROM         
    CustomerCheckins 
INNER JOIN
    Customers_Events ON CustomerCheckins.CustomerID = Customers_Events.CustomerID 
LEFT OUTER JOIN
    Customers ON Customers_Events.CustomerID = Customers.CustomerID 
RIGHT OUTER JOIN
    Events ON Customers_Events.EventID = Events.EventID
WHERE     
    (Customers_Events.CustomerID = 1887)

I would really appreciate some help to solve this problem. I feel I have tried every combination in the script.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should use grouping instead of distinct

SELECT Customers.Firstname, Events.EventName, MIN(CustomerCheckins.CheckinDateTime)
FROM         
    CustomerCheckins 
        INNER JOIN Customers_Events ON CustomerCheckins.CustomerID = Customers_Events.CustomerID 
        INNER JOIN Customers ON Customers_Events.CustomerID = Customers.CustomerID 
        INNER JOIN Events ON Customers_Events.EventID = Events.EventID
WHERE Customers_Events.CustomerID = 1887
GROUP BY Customers.Firstname, Events.EventName
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1  
I don't know why you where downvoted. The code you provided actually worked :-) - except for one little problems: The time stamps are all the same in the three rows returned –  Raydk Oct 18 '13 at 10:33
1  
It doesn't pick up the correct date for each event for the reason I described in my answer. –  Klas Lindbäck Oct 18 '13 at 10:38
    
Btw. What is the difference between grouping and distinct? –  Raydk Oct 18 '13 at 10:38
    
@Raydk In that case, one of the joins is wrong - which without seeing your data structures, we can't identify. It may be the link from Checkins to Events should be on CustomerID and EventID? –  podiluska Oct 18 '13 at 10:41
1  
Distinct works on all selected columns. Grouping works on the columns you specify. The rest of the columns will contain values from one of the grouped rows. Note that if you select other columns than the ones you group by you will get an exception in some databases (like Oracle). –  Klas Lindbäck Oct 18 '13 at 10:45

The problem is with your database design.

Your data model doesn't allow you to link a checkin with a specific event.

If your Event table contains startdate and enddate the problem is solvable; then you can add the time constraints in your join.

Edit:

Luckily, there was a startdate and endate in the event table, so the following SQL should work:

          SELECT Customers.Firstname, Events.EventName, MAX(CustomerCheckins.CheckinDateTime)
            FROM CustomerCheckins 
      INNER JOIN Customers_Events 
              ON CustomerCheckins.CustomerID = Customers_Events.CustomerID 
 LEFT OUTER JOIN Customers 
              ON Customers_Events.CustomerID = Customers.CustomerID 
RIGHT OUTER JOIN Events 
              ON Customers_Events.EventID = Events.EventID
             AND events.StartDateTime <= CustomerCheckins.CheckinDateTime
             AND Events.EndDateTime > CustomerCheckins.CheckinDateTime
           WHERE (Customers_Events.CustomerID = 1887)
        GROUP BY Customers.Firstname, Events.EventName

Note that you need the group by in case the user checked in more then one time during an event.

The choice of MIN or MAX for checkindate depends on whether you want to display the first or the last checkin during the event.

Side note:

I'm not very familiar with the SQL Server query optimizer, but it may be difficult for it to create a good execution plan for this query. Make sure you test it after loading the tables with plenty of data if you plan to use it in a live system.

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I just refreshed the page and saw your answer. My Event table does contain a startdate and enddate. Would it be sufficient to add the constraints like this? AND events.StartDateTime <= CustomerCheckins.CheckinDateTime –  Raydk Oct 18 '13 at 10:42
1  
Yes, but you need it on both startdate and enddate. –  Klas Lindbäck Oct 18 '13 at 10:44
    
Yes of course. It should be Events.EndDateTime > CustomerCheckins.CheckinDateTime –  Raydk Oct 18 '13 at 10:48
    
The application doesn't allow multiple checkins for an Event so that i s not an issue. Without having tested it out further. I haven't noticed any performance issues. The dataset i use to test on contains about 150000 checkins. –  Raydk Oct 18 '13 at 11:20

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