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I have the following table that records when a particular room in a hotel (designated by a three character code [dlx, sup, jac, etc..]) is sold out on a particular DATETIME.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[RoomSoldOut](
    [SoldOutID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [RoomType] [nchar](3) NOT NULL,
    [SoldOutDate] [datetime] NOT NULL,
CONSTRAINT [PK_RoomSoldOut5] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED

I need to find out when a particular date is sold out in the entire hotel. There are 8 room types and if all 8 are sold out then the hotel is booked solid for that night.

the LINQ statement to count the roomtypes sold for a given night works like this.

var solds = from r in RoomSoldOuts
   group r by r.SoldOutDate into s   
   select new
   {
      Date = s.Key,  
      RoomTypeSoldOut = s.Count() 
   };

from this LINQ statement I can get a list of all the sold out DATETIME's with a COUNT of the number of rooms that are sold out.

I need to filter this list to only those DATETIME's where the COUNT = 8, because then the hotel is sold out for that day.

This should be simple but I can not figure out how to do it in LINQ

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think that you need to add the following to the query: where s.Count()==8

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Thank you soooooo Much! –  Bobby Borszich Dec 22 '09 at 7:51

You can also try

var solds = (from r in RoomSoldOuts
    		group r by r.SoldOutDate into s
    		select new
    		{
    			Date = s.Key,
    			RoomTypeSoldOut = s.Count()
    		}).Where(x => x.RoomTypeSoldOut == 8);

You could then also have shortened it to only select the dates

var solds = from r in RoomSoldOuts
    		group r by r.SoldOutDate into s
    		where s.Count() == 8
    		select s.Key;
share|improve this answer
    
I like the extension method but is there any benefit over adding the simple 'where s.Count() == 8' from @Konamiman ? Seems more complex than needed? –  Bobby Borszich Dec 22 '09 at 8:02
1  
That will make an LINQ-to-Objects query around the LINQ-to-SQL query, so it will create objects from all records and filter afterwards instead of using HAVING in the SQL query. –  Guffa Dec 22 '09 at 8:06
    
I would assume you are saying that doing the filter SQL SERVER side is better so we don't transport un-needed data back to the client. I would agree! –  Bobby Borszich Dec 22 '09 at 8:11

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