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How do i call a function of a child class from parent class? Consider this:

class whale
{
  function __construct()
  {
    // some code here
  }

  function myfunc()
  {
  // how do i call the "test" function of fish class here??
  }
}

class fish extends whale
{
  function __construct()
  {
    parent::construct();
  }

  function test()
  {
    echo "So you managed to call me !!";
  }

}
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I know i have put in place wrong class names but this is just an example, not something that i will implement it anywhere. –  Sarfraz Dec 22 '09 at 8:31
1  
in a logical view, fish should be the parent class and whale the child one ;) –  Strae Dec 22 '09 at 11:50
5  
@DaNieL A whale isn't a fish. –  Chris Harrison Aug 24 '11 at 10:40
1  
@Chris ye youre right ;) –  Strae Aug 24 '11 at 12:08
8  
@DaNieL Maybe fish should be the child class as it resides inside the whale after it's been eaten. –  Chris Harrison Aug 24 '11 at 12:48

9 Answers 9

up vote 47 down vote accepted

That's what abstract classes are for. An abstract class basically says: Whoever is inheriting from me, must have this function (or these functions).

abstract class whale
{

  function __construct()
  {
    // some code here
  }

  function myfunc()
  {
    $this->test();
  }

  abstract function test();
}


class fish extends whale
{
  function __construct()
  {
    parent::__construct();
  }

  function test()
  {
    echo "So you managed to call me !!";
  }

}


$fish = new fish();
$fish->test();
$fish->myfunc();
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4  
While correct, I think he wants to do $whale = new Whale; $fish = new Fish; and then $whale->myfunc(); is supposed to call $fish->test(); without knowing $fish exists. –  Gordon Dec 22 '09 at 12:04
    
+1, abstract methods are generally the answer to your question of having parent classes refer to methods in child classes. If Gordon is correct and you're really trying to do something different/specific like that, you should clarify. Otherwise, this should be accepted. –  philfreo Dec 26 '09 at 4:40
    
I searched also this, but your answer does not sovel what I want:whale = new whale(); $whale->test(); :( So one thing which I am thinking about - when called whale controller, then just redirect to fish controller and call. But somehow it feels that redirects are lagging. –  SPeed_FANat1c Jan 20 at 14:01

Technically, you cannot call a fish instance (child) from a whale instance (parent), but since you are dealing with inheritance, myFunc() will be available in your fish instance anyway, so you can call $yourFishInstance->myFunc() directly.

If you are refering to the template method pattern, then just write $this->test() as the method body. Calling myFunc() from a fish instance will delegate the call to test() in the fish instance. But again, no calling from a whale instance to a fish instance.

On a sidenote, a whale is a mammal and not a fish ;)

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this is just an example dude, i am not going to implement those names anywhere :) –  Sarfraz Dec 22 '09 at 8:30

Okay, this answer is VERY late, but why didn't anybody think of this?

Class A{
    function call_child_method(){
        if(method_exists($this, 'child_method')){
            $this->child_method();
        }
    }
}

And the method is defined in the extending class:

Class B extends A{
    function child_method(){
        echo 'I am the child method!';
    }
}

So with the following code:

$test = new B();
$test->call_child_method();

The output will be:

I am a child method!

I use this to call hook methods which can be defined by a child class but don't have to be.

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1  
If all child classes have the same methods you can also consider implementing an interface to the child classes. Thereby you're able to exclude the method_exists() in the parent class. –  Ben Dec 19 '13 at 13:16

Ok, well there are so many things wrong with this question I don't really know where to start.

Firstly, fish aren't whales and whales aren't fish. Whales are mammals.

Secondly, if you want to call a function in a child class from a parent class that doesn't exist in your parent class then your abstraction is seriously flawed and you should rethink it from scratch.

Third, in PHP you could just do:

function myfunc() {
  $this->test();
}

In an instance of whale it will cause an error. In an instance of fish it should work.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for- Firstly, fish aren't whales and whales aren't fish. Whales are mammals. –  mamdouh alramadan Apr 25 at 22:35

what if whale isn't extended? what would that function call result in? Unfortunately there is no way to do it.

Oh, and does a fish extend a whale? A fish is a fish, a whale is a mammal.

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1  
that is just an example without thinking much about it :) –  Sarfraz Dec 22 '09 at 8:08
    
anyways, i could not understand your answer, can u suggest an alternative to it? –  Sarfraz Dec 22 '09 at 8:09

The only way you could do this would be through reflection. However, reflection is expensive and should only be used when necessary.

The true problem here is that a parent class should never rely on the existence of a child class method. This is a guiding principle of OOD, and indicates that there is a serious flaw in your design.

If your parent class is dependent on a specific child, then it cannot be used by any other child classes that might extend it as well. The parent-child relationship goes from abstraction to specificity, not the other way around. You would be much, much better off to put the required function in the parent class instead, and override it in the child classes if necessary. Something like this:

class whale
{
  function myfunc()
  {
      echo "I am a ".get_class($this);
  }
}

class fish extends whale
{
  function myfunc()
  {
     echo "I am always a fish.";
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I doubt it can be done with Reflection. Whale would have to have Fish hardcoded somewhere. –  Gordon Dec 22 '09 at 8:28
    
that is great info :) –  Sarfraz Dec 22 '09 at 8:29

I'd go with the abstract class....
but in PHP you don't have to use them to make it work. Even the invocation of the parent class' constructor is a "normal" method call and the object is fully "operational" at this point, i.e. $this "knows" about all the members, inherited or not.

class Foo
{
  public function __construct() {
    echo "Foo::__construct()\n";
    $this->init();
  }
}

class Bar extends Foo
{
  public function __construct() {
    echo "Bar::__construct()\n";
    parent::__construct();
  }

  public function init() {
    echo "Bar::init()\n";
  }
}

$b = new Bar;

prints

Bar::__construct()
Foo::__construct()
Bar::init()

i.e. even though class Foo doesn't know anything about a function init() it can call the method since the lookup is based on what $this is a reference to.
That's the technical side. But you really should enforce the implementation of that method by either making it abstract (forcing descendants to implement it) or by providing a default implementation that can be overwritten.

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I know this is probably a bit late for you, but I had to get around this problem as well. To help others understand why this is sometimes a requirement, here's my example:

I'm building an MVC framework for an application, I have a base controller class, which is extended by each individual controller class. Each controller will have different methods, depending on what the controller needs to do. Eg, mysite.com/event would load the event controller. mysite.com/event/create will load the event controller and call the 'create' method. In order to standardise the calling of the create function, we need the base controller class to access the methods of the child class, which will be different for every controller. So code-wise, we have the parent class:

class controller {

protected $aRequestBits;

public function __construct($urlSegments) {
    array_shift($urlSegments);
    $this->urlSegments = $urlSegments;      
}

public function RunAction($child) {
    $FunctionToRun = $this->urlSegments[0];
    if(method_exists($child,$FunctionToRun)) {
        $child->$FunctionToRun();
    }
}

}

Then the child class:

class wordcontroller extends controller {

public function add() {
    echo "Inside Add";
}

public function edit() {
    echo "Inside Edit";
}

public function delete() {
    echo "Inside Delete";
}

}

So the solution in my case was to pass the child instance itself back to the parent class as a parameter.

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Since PHP 5.3 you can use the static keyword to call a method from the called class. i.e.:

<?php
class A {
    public static function who() {
        echo __CLASS__;
    }
    public static function test() {
        static::who(); // Here comes Late Static Bindings
    }
}

class B extends A {
    public static function who() {
        echo __CLASS__;
    }
}

B::test();
?>

The above example will output: B

source: PHP.net / Late Static Bindings

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