Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can you guess what is the reason to not allow sealed classes for type-constraints in generics? I only have one explanation is to give opportunity to use naked constraints.

share|improve this question
2  
List<System.Windows.Controls.Button> x = ... uses the non-sealed Button class in a generic constraint, but I'm not sure this what you meant to ask. Can you clarify your question? –  Juliet Dec 22 '09 at 9:13
4  
I think you need to rephrase the question title. It should be "Why we can’t use sealed classes as generic constraints?" –  this. __curious_geek Dec 22 '09 at 9:26
    
Also if you can put some code example with the question - it'd really be helpful. –  this. __curious_geek Dec 22 '09 at 9:27
1  
I have added some code in my answer. it might help. –  this. __curious_geek Dec 22 '09 at 9:44
    
I edited my answer below. –  Andrew Dec 22 '09 at 9:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 35 down vote accepted

If the class is sealed it cannot be inherited. If it cannot be inherited it'd be the only type valid for the generic type argument [assuming if allowed to be a type argument]. If it is the only generic type argument then there's no point in making it generic! You can simply code against the type in non-generic class.

Here's some code for this.

public class A
{
    public A() { }
}

public sealed class B : A
{
    public B() { }
}

public class C<T>
        where T : B
{
    public C() { }
}

This will give compiler error: 'B' is not a valid constraint. A type used as a constraint must be an interface, a non-sealed class or a type parameter.

In addition to this, You can also not have a static class as generic type-constraint. The reason is simple. Static classes are marked as abstract and sealed in compiled IL which can be neither instantiated nor inherited.

Here's the code for this.

public class D<T>
        where T : X
{
    public D() { }
}

public static class X
{
}

This will give compiler error:'X': static classes cannot be used as constraints.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - Would have never thought on this! –  Konamiman Dec 22 '09 at 9:15
1  
Generics is a way to use algorithms universally and to get better performance. So I slightly disagree with your point about inheritance. –  G2. Dec 22 '09 at 9:20
9  
But there's absolutely now way that you could instantiate a C object of any type other than C<B>. Because B is sealed it can have no subclasses, thus there is no other type that will match "where T : B". Therefore, the type T will always be B; otherwise, the constraint fails. If your generic code is constrained so that it applies to exactly one type, is it still generic? :) –  RAOF Dec 22 '09 at 9:54
    
Incidentally, if a class has two generic type parameters, one of which inherits from the other, it's perfectly acceptable for both parameters to be the same sealed class. Even though the fact that the second parameter is a sealed class would imply that the first parameter must be the same sealed class, there's no compiler complaint. I think the basic reason for the complaint was to encourage people not to use generic type parameters which could only ever be one type. –  supercat Aug 8 '11 at 20:22

Are you talking about something like this:

class NonSealedClass
{
}

class Test<T> where T : NonSealedClass
{
}

Because it's perfectly legal.

share|improve this answer
2  
What are you trying to explain with this code-snippet ? –  this. __curious_geek Dec 22 '09 at 9:24
    
He mentioned using a non-sealed class as a generic constraint, I guess he probably meant a sealed class... –  Aviad P. Dec 22 '09 at 9:45
1  
It was my mistake he answered for my incorrect question. –  G2. Dec 22 '09 at 9:46

Honestly, I don't quite see the point of it.

As this.__curious_geek points out in his answer, a sealed class cannot be inherited and so using one as a constraint might seem nonsensical.

But there's no guarantee that a sealed class will never be "unsealed" -- i.e., that the developer might rearrange its implementation to make it more amenable to inheritance and then remove the sealed modifier from the class definition (or just flat-out remove the sealed keyword for no reason at all).

I know a lot of developers actually encourage this practice: not removing the sealed keyword per se, but rather adding the sealed keyword liberally and only supporting inheritance when the decision to do so is made explicitly (and at this point, yes, removing the sealed keyword).

So I'm not sure why you couldn't use the type of a sealed class as a generic constraint. After all, you could always use the type of a class that just happens to not have any derived classes, even though it's not sealed. The two scenarios don't seem all that different to me.

I'm probably missing something, though. I'm sure Eric Lippert could give a pretty killer explanation.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like a stretch... to the extent it is an issue why couldn't you just take advantage of polymorphism on your non-generic method? –  emodendroket Sep 2 at 20:42
    
Usually, when it comes to compile-time checking, every bit of compiled code is considered in its current state. Yes, a sealed class might be unsealed in the future, so maybe the compiler shouldn't output an error. But then, maybe that other method will get an overload with an additional argument in the future, and maybe that unknown class will be added in the future - does that mean that all of those compiler errors should be suppressed, just because the respective lines of code will be meaningful in the future? –  O. R. Mapper Sep 2 at 20:43

A naked constraint is where one generic type inherits from another e.g.

where X:Y

One generic parameter derives from another generic parameter

class Foo<T>
{
    Foo<S> SubsetFoo<S>() where S : T {  }
}

So the class cannot be sealed.

You can also inherit from generics in the normal way so you would not want them sealed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.