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Given the following snippet, fin containing random text with data always following a command:

#define COMMANDSIZE 16
#define DATASIZE 128

int i, j, k, ch;

char command[COMMANDSIZE];
char data[DATASIZE];

FILE* fin;
FILE* fout;

fin = fopen("input.txt", "r");
fout = fopen("output.txt", "w");

fseek(fout, 0, SEEK_SET);

while ((ch = fgetc(fin)) != EOF)
{
    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(command); i++) //obtain command from input stream
    {
         command[i] = fgetc(fin) & 0xff;
    }

    for (j = 0; j < sizeof(data); j++) //obtain data from input stream
    {
         data[j] = fgetc(fin) & 0xff;
    }

    for (k = 0; k < sizeof(data); k++) //write data to output stream
    {
         fseek(fout, /* computed block address */, SEEK_CUR);
         fputc(data[k], fout);
    }
}

fclose(fout);
fclose(fin);

Comparing the input and output file, some data in the input file did not carry over. Thus, I tried doing the above with while(1), and again, some data in the input file did not carry over, but it wasn't the same data as using while((ch = fgetc(fin)) != EOF), and there was not an intersect (some overlap) between the different output files.

How can I ensure all data from the input file is written to the output file? Does this have to do with fgetc() and/or fputc()?

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Jonathan Leffler, Anders K., Lorenzo Donati, Akira, Carey Gregory Oct 22 '13 at 17:15

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
And why aren't you just using fread and fwrite? – Joachim Pileborg Oct 18 '13 at 13:47
    
you seem to have misunderstood file I/O, fseek is not needed in your case and especially not if you open the file in text mode. – Anders K. Oct 18 '13 at 13:52
2  
your fopen() uses "r" and "w" resp. which is textmode by default, for binary mode use "rb" and "wb" – Anders K. Oct 18 '13 at 13:56
1  
Then please don't claim "random" when you don't mean "random". Say "computed" or something. The functions fgetc() and fputc() are as near 100% reliable as anything in computing is. The problem is in your code. Our problem is that we can't yet see exactly what your code is. We need an SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example) and the exact data you're using so that we can attempt to reproduce your problem, and try to understand what's going wrong. We can make guesses, but that's all they are, because we don't know what you expect or really have. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 18 '13 at 14:26
1  
@AndreyT: you're correct that the C standard (ISO/IEC 9899:2011 §7.21.9.2 The fseek function) states: For a text stream, either offset shall be zero, or offset shall be a value returned by an earlier successful call to the ftell function on a stream associated with the same file and whence shall be SEEK_SET. In practice, that's the lowest common denominator rules. Unix-based systems are more flexible and permit the same operations on text files as they do on binary. Granted, the platform has not been stated yet. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 18 '13 at 14:30

A few things are not clear to me here.

while ((ch = fgetc(fin)) != EOF)

Do you intend to throw away the character you just read?

fseek(fout, 1, SEEK_CUR);

Why are you skipping ahead one byte? Writing will advance the file automatically. I don't think you want to advance the file position twice.

share|improve this answer
    
The above is a snippet. In my application, I am using fseek to go to a specific block address. – ᴍᴀsᴛᴇʀᴍɪɴᴅ_ᴇᴅ Oct 18 '13 at 13:54
    
You're doing it each time through the for (k loop. What does that have to do with going to a specific block address? – Barmar Oct 18 '13 at 13:56
    
Again, the above is an example snippet of what I am doing. – ᴍᴀsᴛᴇʀᴍɪɴᴅ_ᴇᴅ Oct 18 '13 at 13:56
    
@edmastermind29 For every single byte? Do you store each byte at a different block? – Joachim Pileborg Oct 18 '13 at 13:56
    
@JoachimPileborg Yes. Depending on the command. – ᴍᴀsᴛᴇʀᴍɪɴᴅ_ᴇᴅ Oct 18 '13 at 13:57

I would do something like this instead:

char command[COMMANDSIZE];
char data[DATASIZE];

FILE* fin;
FILE* fout;

fin = fopen("input.txt", "rb");
fout = fopen("output.txt", "wb");

while (fread(command, sizeof(command), 1, fin) != EOF)
{
    if (fread(data, sizeof(data), 1, fin) != EOF)
    {
        fseek(...);  /* Seek to the block where current data should be written */
        fwrite(data, sizeof(data), 1, fout);
    }
}
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