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I am trying to do a foreach loop for each value in my fetchall_arrayref and am having a bit of trouble.

I have:

my $list = $sth->fetchall_arrayref({});
print Dumper($list);

which gives me:

$VAR1 = [
          {
            'ID_NUMBER' => '123'
          },
          {
            'ID_NUMBER' => '456'
          },
          {
            'ID_NUMBER' => '5666'
          },
          {
            'ID_NUMBER' => '45645'
          },
          {
            'ID_NUMBER' => '23422'
          }
        ];

I am not sure how to format my foreach loop print each id_number's value. Eventually I want to run a query with each value but I can figure that out once I get this working.

Thanks for any help.

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Why are you passing an empty hash ref {} to fetchall_arrayref? That function takes a different set of arguments. –  TLP Oct 18 '13 at 14:35
1  
Short method to extract values from that datastructure my @vals = map values %$_, @$list –  TLP Oct 18 '13 at 14:47
    
TLP: the first parameter is the Slice; if it's a hashref, each row will be returned as a hash instead of an array. –  ysth Oct 18 '13 at 17:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should use fetchrow_hashref instead, and do each one individually. That will make it a lot more readable, and it does not affect performance form a database point of view.

while (my $res = $sth->fetchrow_hashref) {
  print Dumper $res;
  $sth2->execute($res->{ID_NUMBER});
}

If you wanted to do it with the fetchall_hashref, it would work like this:

my $list = $sth->fetchall_arrayref({});
foreach my $res (@{ $list }) {
  $sth2->execute($res->{ID_NUMBER});
}
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Oh this is perfect thanks for the other method and I see what you mean. Makes a lot more sense and is easier to understand. –  BluGeni Oct 18 '13 at 14:35

What you have is a reference to an array of hash references.

Let's break this down:

$list is a _reference to an array. I I can _dereference it by putting the right dereferencing symbol before it. You can get the array by using @$list or @{ $list }. I like the latter one because it makes the fact it's a reference very clear.

for my $row_ref ( @{ $list } ) {
    here be dragons...    # We'll figure this out later...
}

The $row_ref is a reference to a hash. We can again get the hash by putting the % in front: %{ $row_ref }. Thus, we can use %{ $row_ref }{$key} to get the value. However, that syntax is hard to read. We can use the alternative -> which looks like this: $row_ref->{$key}. That's much easier to see. We also know that there's one key and the key is ID_NUMBER:

for my $row_ref ( @{ $list } ) {
    print "ID Number: " . $row_ref->{ID_NUMBER} . "\n";
}

Or, if you weren't sure of the column names:

for my $row_ref ( @{ $list } ) {
    for my $column ( sort keys %{ $row_ref } ) {
       print "$column: " . $row_ref->{$column} . "\n";
    }
}

If you're not familiar with references, read the Perl tutorial.

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You have an array of hashes. It helps if you use descriptive variable names.

my $rows = $sth->fetchall_arrayref({});;
for my $row (@$rows) {
   print($row->{ID_NUMBER}, "\n");
}
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