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I have the need to programmatically generate the approximation of a rainbow spectrum, in a rectangular image, as shown below:

rainbow spectrum

I know how to draw the pixmap, what I'm looking for is how to generate the values of the colors.

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closed as off-topic by Zac Howland, lpapp, Joe Gauterin, Nija, MattDMo Oct 18 '13 at 18:33

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2  
QT has the QColor class where you can set the hue and you can get the RGB from it –  ratchet freak Oct 18 '13 at 15:03
    
Have a look at this: qt-project.org/doc/qt-4.8/paintsystem.html, it has everything you need to know. Once you've done some reading / learning, come back and post a specific programming problem if you get stuck. –  JBentley Oct 18 '13 at 15:06
1  
Are you really asking 1) how to compute the RGB (or HSL, HSV, etc.) value for each location on the bar, or 2) how to create the bar given the correct colors, or 3) both? –  Jerry Coffin Oct 18 '13 at 15:26
2  
Question has been edited into something interesting. Voting to reopen. –  Alexandre C. Oct 18 '13 at 19:30
    
@JerryCoffin, how to create the bar given the correct colors that I have displayed. –  MelMed Oct 21 '13 at 7:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You need to read this paper. Seriously.

Other than that, all it could take is to iterate through hues in the HSL color representation, using QColor::fromHslF(x/*0.8, 0.95, 0.5) where x varies from 0.0 to 1.0 over the rainbow. It's not physically accurate at all, but maybe it would do.

Otherwise, you need a slightly more complex code that very simplistically approximates the paper cited above.

screenshot

#include <QApplication>
#include <QPainter>
#include <QPixmap>
#include <QLabel>
#include <algorithm>
#include <cmath>

QColor wavelengthToColor(qreal lambda)
{
    // Based on: http://www.efg2.com/Lab/ScienceAndEngineering/Spectra.htm
    // The foregoing is based on: http://www.midnightkite.com/color.html
    struct Color {
        qreal c[3];
        QColor toColor(qreal factor) const {
            qreal const gamma = 0.8;
            int ci[3];
            for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
                ci[i] = c[i] == 0.0 ? 0.0 : qRound(255 * pow(c[i] * factor, gamma));
            }
            return QColor(ci[0], ci[1], ci[2]);
        }
    } color;
    qreal factor = 0.0;

    static qreal thresholds[] = { 380, 440, 490, 510, 580, 645, 780 };
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < sizeof(thresholds)/sizeof(thresholds[0]); ++ i) {
        qreal t1 = thresholds[i], t2 = thresholds[i+1];
        if (lambda < t1 || lambda >= t2) continue;
        if (i%2) std::swap(t1, t2);
        color.c[i % 3] = (i < 5) ? (lambda - t2) / (t1-t2) : 0.0;;
        color.c[2-i/2] = 1.0;
        factor = 1.0;
        break;
    }

    // Let the intensity fall off near the vision limits
    if (lambda >= 380 && lambda < 420) {
        factor = 0.3 + 0.7*(lambda-380) / (420 - 380);
    }
    else if (lambda >= 700 && lambda < 780) {
        factor = 0.3 + 0.7*(780 - lambda) / (780 - 700);
    }
    return color.toColor(factor);
}

QPixmap rainbow(int w, int h)
{
    QPixmap pm(w, h);
    QPainter p(&pm);
    qreal f1 = 1.0/400;
    qreal f2 = 1.0/780;
    for (int x = 0; x < w; ++ x) {
        // Iterate across frequencies, not wavelengths
        qreal lambda = 1.0/(f1-(x/qreal(w)*(f1-f2)));
        p.setPen(wavelengthToColor(lambda));
        p.drawLine(x, 0, x, h);
    }
    return pm;
}

class RainbowLabel : public QLabel {
protected:
    void resizeEvent(QResizeEvent *) {
        setPixmap(rainbow(width(), height()));
    }
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QApplication a(argc, argv);
    RainbowLabel l;
    l.resize(600, 100);
    l.show();
    return a.exec();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Thanks for the reference to that paper. It's one of the clearest and most useful explanations I've read of rendering color properly. –  Adrian McCarthy Oct 18 '13 at 18:19
    
I accept your answer. Thank you so much! –  MelMed Oct 21 '13 at 7:36

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