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I have something like this:

pipe
close(pipe[0]);
parent writes something to pipe
close(pipe[1]);
fork();
if(child)
{
  close(pipe[1]);
  child reads from pipe
  close(pipe[0]);
  child does some operations
  child writes to pipe
  close(pipe[1]);
}
else
{
  back to parent
  close(pipe[0]);
  wait(&code);
  parent tries to read what the terminated child just wrote but fails to do so
}

I'm not really sure what can i do to make the parent read from the terminated child. Do i need to make use of dup? I'm not so very sure in what situations dup or dup2 is useful.

writing and reading is done using the write() and read() functions.

I have to use pipes and not fifo's or other means to communicate between processes.

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1  
Post your code. –  thirtythreeforty Oct 18 '13 at 15:43
1  
You might find this article useful: tldp.org/LDP/lpg/node11.html –  πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 18 '13 at 15:48
    
@thirtythreeforty I won't post my code because it's a ton of it and i see no point in doing this, if i explained my issue clearly. I have a child process that ends, and the parent cannot read from the pipe afterwards. I am aware of dup and dup2 but i don't know how and when to use those and if using them can help me. –  Edeph Oct 18 '13 at 15:48
    
Well, at least post a compilable example. There are many, many potential things that could be wrong, from typos to an angry compiler ;) –  thirtythreeforty Oct 18 '13 at 15:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A sample from this article says:

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <unistd.h>
    #include <sys/types.h>

    main()
    {
            int     fd[2];
            pid_t   childpid;

            pipe(fd);

            if((childpid = fork()) == -1)
            {
                    perror("fork");
                    exit(1);
            }

            if(childpid == 0)
            {
                    /* Child process closes up input side of pipe */
                    close(fd[0]);
            }
            else
            {
                    /* Parent process closes up output side of pipe */
                    close(fd[1]);
            }
            .
            .
    }

IIRC that's the way doing it. The crucial thing is to close the unused fd's in parent and child process.

share|improve this answer
    
What does IIRC mean? –  Edeph Oct 18 '13 at 16:51
1  
If I remember correctly –  πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 18 '13 at 16:51
    
Indeed the problem was the closing of the pipes before doing the opposite action(read/write) thank you ! –  Edeph Oct 18 '13 at 18:31
    
Actually there is a issue, it doesn't fix anything for me. I updated my question with further details. –  Edeph Oct 18 '13 at 18:58
    
Yet again, i missed one small detail that ruined the entire program. It was just a tiny trivial error. –  Edeph Oct 18 '13 at 19:18

I think fifo suites your need and I don't think you need to use a dup either. Here is a working code:

#include <fcntl.h>
int main()
{
int e=open("fif",O_RDONLY|O_NONBLOCK);
if(fork()==0)
{
    int d=open("fif",O_WRONLY);
    write(d,"hi there\n",9);
    close(d);
    //sleep(5);
    exit(0);
}
wait();
char buf[15];
int n=read(e,buf,15);
buf[n]=0;
printf("%s", buf);
//wait();
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I need to use pipes for this one. It's a requirement, i'm sorry. –  Edeph Oct 18 '13 at 16:23
    
@Edeph It's the same principle. If you would have read the article link I've given you, you would see ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 18 '13 at 16:28
    
I know but the task that has been assigned to me, states clearly that i have to use pipes. I'm sorry but thank you for your answer! –  Edeph Oct 18 '13 at 19:17

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