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I have text file with many entries like this:

[...]
Wind: 83,476,224
Solution: (category,runs)~
0.235,6.52312667,~
0.98962,14.33858333,~
sdasd,cccc,~
0.996052905,sdsd
EnterValues: 656,136,1
Speed: 48,32
State: 2,102,83,476,224
[...]

From above part I would like to extract:

Solution: (category,runs)~
0.235,6.52312667,~
0.98962,14.33858333,~
sdasd,cccc,~
0.996052905,sdsd

It would be simple if EnterValues: exists after every Solution:, unfortunately it doesn't. Sometime it is Speed, sometime something different. I don't know how to construct the end of regex (I assume it should be sth like this:Solution:.*?(?<!~)\n).

My file has \n as a delimiter of new line.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can match from Solution to word followed by colon,

my ($solution) = $text =~ /(Solution:.*?) \w+: /xs;
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1  
TLP's solution also works, but yours is simpler and does what I want. Thank you! –  her_dom Oct 18 '13 at 20:08

What you need is to apply a "record separator" that has the functionality of a regex. Unfortunately, you cannot use $/, because it cannot be a regex. You can however read the entire file into one line, and split that line using a regex:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my $str = do { 
    local $/;   # disable input record separator
    <DATA>;     # slurp the file
};
my @lines = split /^(?=\pL+:)/m, $str;  # lines begin with letters + colon
print Dumper \@lines;

__DATA__
Wind: 83,476,224
Solution: (category,runs)~
0.235,6.52312667,~
0.98962,14.33858333,~
sdasd,cccc,~
0.996052905,sdsd
EnterValues: 656,136,1
Speed: 48,32
State: 2,102,83,476,224

Output:

$VAR1 = [
          'Wind: 83,476,224
',
          'Solution: (category,runs)~
0.235,6.52312667,~
0.98962,14.33858333,~
sdasd,cccc,~
0.996052905,sdsd
',
          'EnterValues: 656,136,1
',
          'Speed: 48,32
',
          'State: 2,102,83,476,224
'

You will do some sort of post processing on these variables, I assume, but I will leave that to you. One way to go from here is to split the values on newline.

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Could you explain what \pL+ does? Can find it;/. –  her_dom Oct 18 '13 at 19:16
    
\pL is a character class for letters. + is the quantifier, meaning "match one or more times". You can find \pL in perldoc.perl.org/perlrecharclass.html –  TLP Oct 18 '13 at 19:19

As I see you first read all file to memory, but this is not a good pracrice. Try use flip flop operator:

while ( <$fh> ) {
   if ( /Solution:/ ... !/~$/ ) {
      print $_, "\n";
   }
}

I can't test it right now, but I think this should work fine.

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This solution requires you to know that Solution comes before either of the keywords. –  TLP Oct 18 '13 at 16:15
    
Thx! But is it possible to solve with only with regex? –  her_dom Oct 18 '13 at 16:17
    
@TLP, yes, but maybe it can be fixing by modifying the second regexp:) –  Suic Oct 18 '13 at 16:20
    
@her_dom, yes, take a look at TLP's answer –  Suic Oct 18 '13 at 16:20
    
Also, it will include the header for the next value in the print. A better regex to close the flip flip might be /^\pL+:/, but you still have to compensate for the extra line. –  TLP Oct 18 '13 at 16:21

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